Handbook of Twentieth-Century Literatures of India

By Nalini Natarajan | Go to book overview

13 Dalit Literature in Marathi

VEENA DEO


INTRODUCTION

The term "Dalit" literature has been in use since 1958, the year of the first Conference of the Maharashtra Dalit Sahitya Sangha (i.e., Maharashtra Dalit Literary Society) in Bombay, and is a marker for a numerous and exciting literary production.1 Its advent and persistent output shook the Marathi mainstream literary tradition to its core by its representation of the lives of the most marginalized--the previous untouchable communities of the Hindu caste system. The Marathi literary reader, scholarly as well as casual, heard a new language; a new, direct, angry, accusatory, and analytic voice; and a literary production that dared to question centuries-old myths, traditions, and practices. Despite some initial defensive critical moves by the literary establishment, Dalit writing has found its readers and supporters in Maharashtra and is now commonly used in school textbooks and college curricula in Marathi literature departments.

This brief survey of Dalit Marathi literature attempts to understand and outline interconnections of liberal humanism, Marxism, and Hindu reform/Buddhism in Dalit writing's advent and proliferation as an integral part of the tensions of modernity.


Phule and Ambedkar: The Two Visionary Anchors

Even a brief attempt to situate Dalit writing in its historical context necessitates the mention of two very forceful thinkers from Maharashtra's past-- Mahatma Jyotiba Phule ( 1828-90) and Bheemrao Ramji Ambedkar ( 1891- 1956). We need to remind ourselves here to consider the importance of struggles for social reform and individual rights in the complex and changing context of colonial rule, struggles for home rule, nationalist movements, and the establish-

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Handbook of Twentieth-Century Literatures of India
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction: Regional Literatures of India-Paradigms and Contexts 1
  • WORKS CITED 18
  • 1- Twentieth-Century Assamese Literature 21
  • Introduction 21
  • WORKS CITED 42
  • SELECTED PRIMARY BIBLIOGRAPHY 42
  • SELECTED PRIMARY BIBLIOGRAPHY 44
  • 2- Twentieth-Century Bengali Literature 45
  • SELECTED PRIMARY BIBLIOGRAPHY 81
  • SELECTED PRIMARY BIBLIOGRAPHY 83
  • 3- Twentieth-Century Indian Literature in English 84
  • INTRODUCTION: THE EVOLUTION OF INDIAN LITERATURE IN ENGLISH 84
  • Notes 95
  • WORKS CITED 96
  • SELECTED PRIMARY BIBLIOGRAPHY 96
  • 4- Twentieth-Century Gujarati Literature 100
  • Conclusion 127
  • SELECTED PRIMARY BIBLIOGRAPHY 128
  • 5- Twentieth-Century Hindi Literature 134
  • Introduction 134
  • Conclusion 152
  • Notes 153
  • Notes 154
  • Notes 155
  • References 157
  • 6- Twentieth-Century Kannada Literature 160
  • Introduction 160
  • WORKS CITED 176
  • SELECTED PRIMARY BIBLIOGRAPHY 176
  • SELECTED PRIMARY BIBLIOGRAPHY 178
  • 7- Twentieth-Century Malayalam Literature 180
  • SELECTED PRIMARY BIBLIOGRAPHY 203
  • 8- Twentieth-Century Marathi Literature 207
  • Introduction 207
  • Notes 238
  • WORKS CITED 239
  • WORKS CITED 241
  • 9- Twentieth-century Panjabi Literature 249
  • SELECTED PRIMARY BIBLIOGRAPHY 286
  • 10- Twentieth-Century Tamil Literature 289
  • WORKS CITED 301
  • SELECTED PRIMARY BIBLIOGRAPHY 301
  • SELECTED PRIMARY BIBLIOGRAPHY 305
  • 11- Twentieth-Century Telugu Literature 306
  • INTRODUCTION: HISTORY AND CONTEXT 306
  • Conclusion 326
  • SELECTED PRIMARY BIBLIOGPAPHY 326
  • SELECTED PRIMARY BIBLIOGPAPHY 328
  • 12- Twentieth-Century Urdu Literature 329
  • WORKS CITED 358
  • 13- Dalit Literature in Marathi 363
  • Introduction 363
  • Notes 377
  • WORKS CITED 377
  • WORKS CITED 378
  • 14- Parsi Literature in English 382
  • INTRODUCTION: HISTORY AND CONTEXT 382
  • Conclusion 395
  • WORKS CITED 395
  • SELECTED PRIMARY BIBLIOGRAPHY 396
  • References 397
  • 15- Sanskrit Poetics 398
  • WORKS CITED 406
  • WORKS CITED 407
  • 16- Perspectives on Bengali Film and Literature 410
  • Introduction 410
  • WORKS CITED 421
  • Selected General Critical Bibliography 423
  • Index 425
  • About the Contributors 439
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