Clinton's World: Remaking American Foreign Policy

By William G. Hyland | Go to book overview

7
European Security

A trip to Europe is usually good for a president. A carefully arranged grand tour almost always means crowds, receptions, honors, photo opportunities, and even some serious business. Clinton enjoyed the public side and could charm his various hosts. But it was the business side of his first venture into Europe--the enlargement of the NATO alliance--that would have the more lasting effect. Indeed, with his trip in January 1994 to Europe and Russia Clinton would embark on a project that was most likely to define his foreign policy.

Clinton delayed his trip until almost a year after his inauguration. There was the inevitable speculation that the delay was calculated. It was no secret that the British prime minister, John Major, had supported Bush's reelection. Clinton's decision to start his trip in Brussels, at NATO headquarters, skipping London altogether, seemed a spiteful choice (denied, of course). Other European leaders had been sympathetic to Bush, if for no other reason that he was a known quantity. Helmut Kohl, the German chancellor, obviously owed Bush a huge debt for his role in securing the unification of Germany. The French were more cynical; a new, inexperienced president might provide some maneuvering room to advance France's ambitions in Europe and around the globe.

The general posture of the Clinton administration worried some Europeans. Rarely has a president been subjected to more skeptical scrutiny in Europe than was Bill Clinton in January 1994. R. W. Apple Jr., writing in the New York Times, set the stage for the visit:

-93-

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Clinton's World: Remaking American Foreign Policy
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents *
  • 1- The Legacy 1
  • 2- Mandate for Change 15
  • 3- Intervention 29
  • 4- Nation Building 51
  • 5- South of the Border 67
  • 6- Russia 79
  • 7- European Security 93
  • 8- Asian Tangles 109
  • Notes 124
  • 9- Unsinkable Japan 127
  • 10- Watershed 137
  • 11- Endgame 145
  • 12- Oslo and Beyond 155
  • Notes 168
  • 13 171
  • 14- Crisis Management 185
  • 15- Between Hope And History 197
  • Selected Bibliography 207
  • Index 209
  • About the Author *
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