The Learned Presidency: Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, Woodrow Wilson

By David H. Burton | Go to book overview

PROLOGUE

An office desired "by an enlightened and reasonable people"

The presidency of the United States was intended from the outset as an office to command attention and respect. Writing in The Federalist, the papers by Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, and John Jay expounding the Constitution and of which Jefferson once remarked there was "no better book" respecting the practice of constitutional government, Hamilton defended so powerful an office in a republic. The basis of his argument was that it should and would be occupied by "characters pre- eminent for ability and virtue."1 Even in anticipation, the quality of the men in the presidency was thought critical to the success of the position. In certain ways the inclusion of a single magistrate designed to exercise a wide range of executive power was a daring proposal. Memories of "the royal brute and tyrant," "the sullen hardfisted pharoah," as Tom Paine described George III in Common Sense, were vivid and troubling.2 Patriot indictments of the king had gone a long way toward making Americans suspicious of monarchs or those who might be made to look like them. It was against "the images of Asiatic despotism and voluptuousness" conjured by opponents of the Constitution that Hamilton was moved to write of what his countrymen might expect in their president.3 In the various Federalist essays dealing with the presidency that appeared over the signature of Publius in the New York Packet during March and April 1788, Hamilton both destroyed the charges levied at Article Two of the Constitution, the Executive Article, and explained in reassuring fashion the nature, powers, and purpose of the presidency. In his judgment "well directed men," those of "understanding," would grace the presidency, men "disposed to view human nature as it is, without either flattering its virtues or exaggerating its vices." Finally, Hamilton envisioned the presidency as an office that would be desired "by an enlightened and reasonable people," exhibiting in their choice the attributes that were to be the distinctions of a responsible chief executive.4

Reading The Federalist papers that treat the presidency, thoughts of the

-19-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Learned Presidency: Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, Woodrow Wilson
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 5
  • Contents 9
  • Acknowledgments 10
  • Preface 11
  • Prologue 19
  • 1 - Theodore Roosevelt Learned Style 38
  • 2 - William Howard Taft Legal Mind 89
  • 3 - Woodrow Wilson Righteous Scholar 136
  • Epilogue 193
  • Notes 200
  • Select Bibliography 213
  • Index 218
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 228

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.