Closing Pandora's Box: Arms Races, Arms Control, and the History of the Cold War

By Patrick Glynn | Go to book overview

FOREWORD

"Today detachment and objectivity seem to me less important than to tell a tale of large conceptions, great achievements, and some failures, the product of enormous will and effort." So wrote Dean Acheson in the preface to his spellbinding memoir of the early Cold War, Present at the Creation.1 With odd power, Acheson's phrases capture something of the drama and the grandeur, the importance and the scope, of the era that we have just lived through. The Cold War is over. The twentieth century is really at an end, ten years before its time.2 And already the ideas, the passions, the fears, the hopes that were so much a part of that century and that engulfed all of us who lived through it are fading from memory.

Today we are embarking on an age seemingly very different from the age we have just left behind. While nuclear dangers certainly remain, the threat of global Armageddon no longer appears to hang so heavily over humanity. The great ideological struggle--the struggle for hearts and minds, for humanity's future--has been played out. The long war between the dictators and the democracies has been waged and largely won, and the dictators seem to be in rout.

The Cold War is over. Why, then, a history of the Cold War now? Not merely to commemorate the past, though it deserves commemoration. Not merely to celebrate a victory, though a celebration may be in order. But to learn what the past has to teach us, and to carry that lesson with us into the uncertain future. That is the purpose of this book.

From the perspective of the liberal democracies, the Cold War in

-ix-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Closing Pandora's Box: Arms Races, Arms Control, and the History of the Cold War
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Foreword ix
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • Chapter 1 - The Sarajevo Fallacy 1
  • Chapter 2 - The Munich Blunder 45
  • Chapter 3 - Cold War, Atomic Peace 84
  • Chapter 4 - Debating the Absolute Weapon 123
  • Chapter 5 - Staying Out of Vietnam--The Logic of "Massive Retaliation" 138
  • Chapter 6 - The Cuban Cauldron 172
  • Chapter 7 - Limited Arms, Limited War 214
  • Chapter 8 - The Age of Arms Control 234
  • Chapter 9 - The New Morality 273
  • Chapter 10 - Tough Cop, Good Cop 306
  • Epilogue 361
  • Notes 371
  • Index 431
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 448

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.