Closing Pandora's Box: Arms Races, Arms Control, and the History of the Cold War

By Patrick Glynn | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

This book was several years in the making, and I have many people to thank. In January 1989, Christopher C. DeMuth invited me to join the American Enterprise Institute for Public Policy Research (AEI) in Washington as a resident scholar. Since then, Chris has looked on patiently as my main intellectual energies have gone into a long-term work of history and scholarship, with no visible payoff in the short run. In a city where the time horizon rarely extends more than forty-eight hours in either direction, Chris is rare in emphasizing the role of serious books in shaping the basic framework of public policy discourse. With the help of an unusually committed board of directors and a dedicated staff, he and Executive Vice President David Gerson have created an environment of intellectual excitement, collegiality, and high purpose. All of us at AEI understand ourselves to be extremely fortunate and part of an important enterprise, helping to shape the thinking that will shape our country's future. Those of us in foreign policy studies, under Jeane Kirkpatrick's able leadership, are particularly content.

By the time I joined AEI, I was already well along on this project, thanks in part to Martin Peretz, whom I still remember as the kindest teacher I had during my undergraduate days at Harvard. On a visit to Washington in 1983, I mentioned in passing to my old teacher Marty that I had an idea for a book on the history of arms control; I soon had a contract with New Republic Books. Marty's belief in me at this very early point was critical; it transformed the idea into a potential reality.

This book could not have been produced without the generous sup-

-xiii-

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Closing Pandora's Box: Arms Races, Arms Control, and the History of the Cold War
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Foreword ix
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • Chapter 1 - The Sarajevo Fallacy 1
  • Chapter 2 - The Munich Blunder 45
  • Chapter 3 - Cold War, Atomic Peace 84
  • Chapter 4 - Debating the Absolute Weapon 123
  • Chapter 5 - Staying Out of Vietnam--The Logic of "Massive Retaliation" 138
  • Chapter 6 - The Cuban Cauldron 172
  • Chapter 7 - Limited Arms, Limited War 214
  • Chapter 8 - The Age of Arms Control 234
  • Chapter 9 - The New Morality 273
  • Chapter 10 - Tough Cop, Good Cop 306
  • Epilogue 361
  • Notes 371
  • Index 431
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