Public Colleges and Universities

By John F. Ohles; Shirley M. Ohles | Go to book overview

K

KANSAS, THE UNIVERSITY OF. Lawrence, Kansas 66045 (913) 864-2700. The state of Kansas established the University of Kansas in 1864. A seven-acre site was secured in Lawrence, Kansas, in 1865 and coeducational preparatory school classes were opened in a new building on September 12, 1866, with fifty- five students and a faculty of three under Robert W. Oliver, chancellor. John Fraser (BDAE) succeeded Oliver in 1867; he served until 1874. A second building was constructed in 1872. The first students were graduated on June 11, 1873. James Marvin was chancellor from 1874 to 1883. A Law Department was opened in 1878 and a pharmacy program in 1885. The programs were elevated in status to schools of Law and Pharmacy in 1890. The Chemistry Building was constructed in 1884 and Snow Hall of Natural History in 1886. In 1880 a preparatory medical course was established.

Francis Huntington Snow was chancellor from 1890 to 1901; he was succeeded by Frank Strong (BDAE), who served from 1902 to 1920. The Engineering School was organized in 1891 and the Graduate School in 1897. The Medical School was established in 1899; it eventually became the University of Kansas College of Health Sciences and Hospital* at Kansas City, Kansas. During World War I a Students' Army Training Corps program was conducted on the campus. Ernest Hiram Lindley (BDAE) was chancellor from 1920 to 1939. In 1924 Governor Jonathan M. Davis attempted to remove Lindley from office; the effort failed when Ben S. Paulen took office as governor in 1925. Under Deane Waldo Malott ( 1939-1951) the university conducted an Army Specialized Training Program and Navy V-1, V-5, V-7, and V-12 programs on the campus during World War II. There was a rapid growth in enrollment following the war. Malott was succeeded by Franklin David Murphy ( 1951-1960) and William Clarke Wescoe ( 1960-1969). Archie Reece Dykes was president from 1973 to 1980.

On the 1,000-acre campus are more than eighty buildings, including Watson Library, Danforth Chapel, Helen Foresman Spencer Museum of Art, Hoch Auditorium, Kenneth A. Spencer Research Library, Art and Design Building,

-297-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Public Colleges and Universities
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • Notes x
  • A 1
  • B 43
  • C 59
  • D 151
  • E 161
  • F 181
  • G 209
  • H 241
  • I 253
  • J 289
  • K 297
  • L 317
  • M 349
  • N 449
  • O 601
  • P 635
  • Q 651
  • R 653
  • S 669
  • T 733
  • U 799
  • W 833
  • Y 911
  • Appendix 1: Years Founded 915
  • Appendix 2: Location by States 939
  • Appendix 3: Land-Grant Institutions 955
  • Appendix 4: Specialized Institutions 957
  • Index 961
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 1016

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.