Public Colleges and Universities

By John F. Ohles; Shirley M. Ohles | Go to book overview

U

UNITED STATES AIR FORCE ACADEMY . U.S. Air Force Academy, Colorado 80840 (303) 472-1818. The United States Congress authorized establishment of the Air Force Academy on April 1, 1954. A site was purchased north of Colorado Springs, Colorado, and the first class of 306 cadets was located temporarily at Lowry Air Force Base in Denver, Colorado. Hubert Reilly Harmon ( 1954-1956) was the first of a succession of Air Force generals to serve as superintendent of the academy. The first class of 306 cadets was sworn in on July 11, 1955. On August 29, 1958, the cadets were moved to the new campus, and on June 3, 1959, the first class was graduated and commissioned as Air Force officers. The admission of women was authorized on October 7, 1975, and the first group of 157 women were admitted on June 28, 1976. The first 97 women were graduated on May 28, 1980. The academy is located on an 18,000- acre site. The campus includes the original buildings: Harmon Hall administration building, Arnold Hall social center, Planetarium, Cadet Gymnasium, and Fairchild Hall academic building; Cadet Chapel ( 1962); Cadet Field House ( 1968); a dining hall; and two cadet dormitories. Located south of the academic complex are the Academy Hospital, faculty and staff facilities, the Academy Preparatory School, and an airstrip; Falcon Stadium and Eisenhower Golf Course were financed by private funds. The nearby Farish Memorial Recreation Area was donated to the academy.

United States Air Force Academy is a public, coeducational, residential institution preparing officers for the U.S. Air Force. It operates on the semester academic calendar with a summer term. In the 1980s the academy had 4,000 cadets and a primarily military faculty of 550. All cadets are on full scholarship. They receive the bachelor of science degree and are commissioned as Air Force officers. Cadet candidates are nominated by the U.S. vice-president, senators, congressmen, administrators of Puerto Rico and other American possessions, and from the Philippine Islands and American republics. The cadets are selected through a competitive process. The academy conducts exchange programs with

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Public Colleges and Universities
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • Notes x
  • A 1
  • B 43
  • C 59
  • D 151
  • E 161
  • F 181
  • G 209
  • H 241
  • I 253
  • J 289
  • K 297
  • L 317
  • M 349
  • N 449
  • O 601
  • P 635
  • Q 651
  • R 653
  • S 669
  • T 733
  • U 799
  • W 833
  • Y 911
  • Appendix 1: Years Founded 915
  • Appendix 2: Location by States 939
  • Appendix 3: Land-Grant Institutions 955
  • Appendix 4: Specialized Institutions 957
  • Index 961
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