Public Colleges and Universities

By John F. Ohles; Shirley M. Ohles | Go to book overview

W

WASHBURN UNIVERSITY OF TOPEKA. Topeka, Kansas 66621 (913) 295-6300. Lincoln College was established on February 6, 1865, in Topeka, Kansas, under a charter granted by the state of Kansas to the General Association of Congregational Ministers and Churches of Kansas. A building was constructed at the corner of Tenth and Jackson streets in Topeka, and classes began in January 1866. In November 1868 the name was changed to Washburn College after receipt of a $25,000 gift from Deacon Ichabod Washburn of Worcester, Massachusetts. H. Q. Butterfield was the first president ( 1869-1871); he was succeeded by Peter McVicar (BDAE), who served from 1871 to 1895. A new campus was secured in 1872, and Rice Hall was completed in 1874. In 1903 the School of Law was established, and George Barlow Penny (BDAE) organized and directed the School of Fine Arts ( 1903-1907). Carnegie Hall library building was added in 1903. The Kansas Medical College became the Medical School of Washburn College in 1903; it continued until 1913. A degree program in economics was initiated in 1904. Under Frank Knight Sanders ( 1908-1913) the enrollment reached 820 students. Parley Paul Womer was president from 1915 to 1931. Benton Hall was constructed in 1923.

Philip Coates King served as president ( 1931-1941) during the difficult years of the Great Depression. In 1940 the Board of Trustees offered to turn the college over to a municipal university, with the approval of the voters. The proposal was approved by the voters in a special election, and the transfer to Washburn Municipal University was made on June 13, 1941. Bryan Sewell Stoffer was president from 1942 to 1961. A bachelor of business administration degree was offered in 1946. On January 2, 1952, the name was changed to Washburn University of Topeka. The university began to receive state aid in 1961-1962. A master of education degree was authorized in 1960 and a master of arts degree in 1980. John Wayne Henderson served as president from 1965 to 1981. On June 8, 1966, a tornado destroyed six buildings and two sorority houses and damaged most of the other buildings. Buildings were rebuilt or replaced. The

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Public Colleges and Universities
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • Notes x
  • A 1
  • B 43
  • C 59
  • D 151
  • E 161
  • F 181
  • G 209
  • H 241
  • I 253
  • J 289
  • K 297
  • L 317
  • M 349
  • N 449
  • O 601
  • P 635
  • Q 651
  • R 653
  • S 669
  • T 733
  • U 799
  • W 833
  • Y 911
  • Appendix 1: Years Founded 915
  • Appendix 2: Location by States 939
  • Appendix 3: Land-Grant Institutions 955
  • Appendix 4: Specialized Institutions 957
  • Index 961
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