The Steel Crisis: The Economics and Politics of a Declining Industry

By William Scheuerman | Go to book overview

3
The Golden Years: From Dominance to Decline

At the end of World War II in 1945, America's steel industry was the most powerful in the world. Its plant capacity was almost double that of all "iron curtain" countries combined, and there was no apparent chance that the devastated facilities in Germany and Japan would ever again rise to challenge American mastery.

Walter Adams

Secret collusion is undoubtedly common, but it has its drawbacks and risks, and can hardly be described as the norm toward which a typical oligopolistic industry tends. That norm, it seems clear, is a kind of tacit collusion which reaches its most developed form in what is known as "price leadership."

Paul A. Baron and Paul M. Sweezy

On the eve of the United States' entry into World War II, Henry Luce described the remainder of the twentieth century as "America's Century." By the end of the war Luce's characterization proved accurate. While the rest of the industrial world suffered from the devastation wrought by armed conflict, U.S. industrial might thrived as never before. Fueled by the productive requirements of international conflict, in a four-year period the nation's GNP more than doubled, jumping from $100 billion in 1940 to $210 billion in 1944.1

U.S. hegemony emerged as the dominant international economic characteristic in the period immediately following the war. By 1947, for instance, U.S. industry produced almost 50 percent of the world's manufactured goods. But America's unchallenged economic supremacy threatened to undercut its future success, for domestic producers

-45-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Steel Crisis: The Economics and Politics of a Declining Industry
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Contents xi
  • List of Tables and Figures xiii
  • 1 - Steel on the Slide 1
  • 2 - Law and Social Power 22
  • Notes 39
  • 3 - The Golden Years: From Dominance to Decline 45
  • Notes 61
  • 4 - Protectionism and Disinvestment 64
  • Notes 94
  • 5 - Instrumental Politics and the Trade Act 98
  • Notes 125
  • 6 - Recovery, Relapse, and Retrenchment: The Trigger Price Mechanism 129
  • 7 - Restructuring: The Politics of Disinvestment 151
  • Notes 182
  • 8 - Economic Decline and Democratic Demise: Prospects for the Future 185
  • Notes 206
  • Index 209
  • About the Author 221
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 221

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.