The Tribal Basis of American Life: Racial, Religious, and Ethnic Groups in Conflict

By Murray Friedman; Nancy Isserman | Go to book overview

4
The Tribes of Brooklyn: Race, Class, and
Ethnicity in the Crown Heights Riots

Jonathan Rieder

Ever since a white driver back in 1991 hit and killed a seven-year-old black boy and a Brooklyn neighborhood exploded in violence, Crown Heights has joined Bensonhurst and Howard Beach as symbols of racial meanness in this often fractious polyglot city. The incident became one more of those ritual moments in which New York City periodically exorcises its racial demons. But the violence there, which included the murder of Yankel Rosenbaum by a raging black mob, had more than local significance. It was arguably among the very worst outbreaks of anti-Semitic violence in the United States. Beyond the compass of black- Jewish relations, the sorry episode resembles other moments in our national life--most obviously the Los Angeles riots--that proclaim the fragility of pluralism and the enduring power of tribalism. How to sort out its complexity thus remains an urgent necessity.1

For some observers trying to fathom those events, the narrative frame of racial conflict, no matter how disturbing, offered at least the reassuring compensation of familiarity. This was true despite the turn-around involved in the black attack on defenseless whites. Throughout the 1950s and much of the 1960s, the nature of the task of dismantling the racist system of segregation lent a certain clarity, both moral and cognitive, to the axis of white and black conflict. To some extent, moreover, the am-

-61-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Tribal Basis of American Life: Racial, Religious, and Ethnic Groups in Conflict
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 168

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.