Jazz in Black and White: Race, Culture, and Identity in the Jazz Community

By Charley Gerard | Go to book overview

3
Race and Religious Identity

Religious identity and spiritual discovery have been important themes in the jazz community for half a century. As early as the 1940s several prominent African-American musicians converted to Islam. In the 1950s religious fervor became a strong element in jazz through the music of Horace Silver, Bobby Timmons, Charles Mingus, and other composers. In the 1960s black jazz musicians were attracted to religions in which mystical experience plays a central role.

Race played a central role in forming the religious identities of black jazz musicians. They steered clear of the religious establishment because they believed it to be hopelessly enmeshed in social patterns that have helped to maintain racially oppressive roles and promote materialistic values. Their adoption of religions that were new to this country, like Buddhism, represented both a rejection of America's religious past and a withdrawal from its social norms.


EASTERN RELIGIONS

Islam

Islam has probably existed in the United States since the early days of slavery. A small percentage of slaves were Muslims, and documents writ-

-73-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Jazz in Black and White: Race, Culture, and Identity in the Jazz Community
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Copyright Acknowledgments v
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction xi
  • 1 - Black Music, Black Identity 1
  • 2 - African Music, African Identity 39
  • 3 - Race and Religious Identity 73
  • 4 - Race and Jazz Communities 83
  • 5 - Black Music, White Identity 97
  • 6 - Colorless Swing 117
  • 7 - Racial Identity and Three Lives 127
  • 8 - Racial Identity Embedded in Performance 153
  • 9 - The Right of Swing 165
  • Notes 171
  • Selected Bibliography 189
  • Index 195
  • About the Author *
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 202

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.