Murder Most Rare: The Female Serial Killer

By Michael D. Kelleher; C. L. Kelleher | Go to book overview

APPENDIX 3: MUNCHAUSEN
SYNDROME BY PROXY

In 1951, Richard Asher introduced the term Munchausen syndrome to describe an unusual psychological disorder that had been previously unrecognized by the medical profession. Victims of this disorder were characterized by behavior involving the fabrication of a variety, of self-induced illnesses so that the individual could demand and receive extensive, intense attention from medical professionals. Asher noted that individuals who were afflicted with this disorder would typically falsely create elaborate medical histories, induce a variety of physical symptoms to validate the medial attention they desperately craved, and travel great distances to a large number of medical facilities in search of the desired interaction. Asher's recognition of Munchausen syndrome was a significant contribution to medical science; it explained a growing number of medical and psychiatric case histories that had been previously considered inexplicable or been severely misdiagnosed.

In 1977, an English pediatrician recognized a derivation of this complex psychological disorder and introduced the concept of Munchausen syndrome by proxy (MSBP) into the medical literature. Unlike Munchausen syndrome, in which the victim of the disorder inflicts injury to herself in order to gain medical attention, MSBP involves the fabrication of illnesses in a dependent individual, who is typically a child or ward of the adult affected by the disorder. With MSBP, the perpetrator indirectly assumes the role of patient (by proxy) by fabricating or inducing illnesses in another person. Both Munchausen syndrome and MSBP are overwhelmingly diagnosed in females, although there exist case histories in which these disorders have been recognized in males.

The unfortunate victim of the adult who suffers from MSBP is most often a child under the age of six. However, on rare occasions the individual who suffers from MSBP will victimize another adult in order to induce or fabricate illnesses. In either case, the American Psychiatric Association (APA) has

-201-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Murder Most Rare: The Female Serial Killer
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction ix
  • 1 - The Quiet Killers 1
  • Notes 17
  • 2 - Black Windows 19
  • Notes 57
  • 3 - Angles of Death 59
  • Notes 70
  • 4 - Sexual Predators 73
  • Notes 83
  • 5 - Revenge 85
  • Notes 91
  • 6 - For Profit or Crime 93
  • Notes 106
  • 7 - Team Killers 107
  • 8 - The Question of Sanity 161
  • Notes 172
  • 9 - The Unexplained 173
  • Notes 187
  • 10 - The Unsolved 189
  • Notes 196
  • Appendix 1 - Statistical Information 197
  • Appendix 2 - Alphabetical Listing of Female Serial Killers 199
  • Appendix 3 - Munchausen Syndrome By Proxy 201
  • Selected Bibliography 205
  • Index 209
  • About the Authors 214
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 214

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.