Community and Political Thought Today

By Peter Augustine Lawler; Dale McConkey | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

This book has its origins in a conference on communitarianism and civil society held in October 1996 at Berry College. Almost all of the contributors participated in that conference, and most of the book's chapters were presented in earlier forms there. The sponsors of the conference were Berry College's Departments of Political Science and Sociology, Oglethorpe University, the Berry College Student Government, and the Chautauqua Council, a Berry College student organization. We thank all of these fine organizations for their support. The sponsorship of the Intercollegiate Studies Institute deserves to be mentioned separately, in view of its generosity.

The conference was distinguished by large and varied student involvement. The Chautauqua Council handled expertly many of the conference's details, under the extraordinary guidance of David Lindrum. Jason Maxwell, Amber Still, Jocelyn Jones, and Lynsey Morris also made outstanding contributions, showing that maybe we at Berry College really do inculcate moral virtue. Oglethorpe's Brad Stone, a very unusual sociologist, also participated in the conference's planning. Donna Worsham, friend of the Berry freshmen, produced all the conference materials.

Lynsey Morris and Darrell Sutton did a great deal of careful proofreading. Kathy Gann whipped the manuscript into shape for publication with her routine excellence. Elizabeth Thompson prepared the Index.

-ix-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Community and Political Thought Today
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 244

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.