Strategy after Deterrence

By Stephen J. Cimbala | Go to book overview

NOTES

The author gratefully acknowledges comments on an earlier draft of this chapter by Andrew Goldberg and references to Soviet sources suggested by Jacob W. Kipp, John G. Hines, and Phillip A. Petersen.

1.
The concept of postnuclear era is explained in Edward N. Luttwak, "An Emerging Postnuclear Era", The Wash0ington Quarterly 11, no. 1 (Winter 1988): 5-18.
2.
See John J. Mearsheimer, Conventional Deterrence ( Ithaca, N.Y.: Cornell University Press, 1984), Ch. 6. The issue of conventional force balances in Europe and the likelihood of successful conventional defense for NATO is obviously contentious among analysts. See, for example: John J. Mearsheimer, "Why the Soviets Can't Win Quickly in Central Europe", International Security 7, no. 1 (Summer 1982): 3-39; Barry R. Posen, "Measuring the European Conventional Balance: Coping with Complexity in Threat Assessment", International Security 9, no. 3 (Winter 1984/85): 47-88; Joshua M. Epstein , "Dynamic Analysis and the Conventional Balance in Europe", International Security 12, no. 4 (Spring 1988): 154-65; and Eliot A. Cohen, "Toward Better Net Assessment: Rethinking the European Conventional Balance", International Security 13, no. 1 (Summer 1988): 50-89. Each of these articles contains numerous references, and the authors carry on the debate in a series of exchanges in the Spring 1989 issue of International Security, passim.
3.
See Christopher N. Donnelly, "Soviet Operational Concepts in the 1980s", Strengthening Conventional Deterrence in Europe: Proposals for the 1980s: Report of the European Security Study ( New York: St Martin's Press, 1983), 105-36, and William E. Odom , "Soviet Military Doctrine", Foreign Affairs 67, no. 2 (Winter 1988/89): 114-34 on Soviet doctrine pertinent to war in Europe. Donnelly's article is especially useful on the preparatory phase of Soviet contingency planning. Odom distinguishes among Soviet military-technical preparedness for three generic missions: stability of the rear; contiguous theater war; and noncontiguous war, which may occur in several theaters simultaneously.
4.
On May 11, 1989, Gorbachev offered to negotiate bilateral NATO-Pact reductions in forces, allowing each side some 1.3 million personnel and 20,000 main battle tanks, along with other reductions in main equipments. See Atlantic Council of the U.S., Indicators of Change in Soviet Security Policies, 25 Feb., 1990, 2.
5.
I am indebted to Michael MccGwire for helping to put this in context. See Michael MccGwire, Military Objectives in Soviet Foreign Policy ( Washington, D.C.: Brookings Institution, 1987). However, the expectation that global war will soon disappear as a serious Soviet planning contingency is partly dependent upon Soviet reading of Western intentions. See Marshal N. V. Ogarkov, Vsegda v gotovnosti k zashchite Otechestva (Always in Readiness to Defend the Fatherland)( Moskow: Voyenizdat, 1982), 16 and M. A. Gareyev; M. V. Frunze: Military Theorist [Original ed.: Voyenny teoretik ( Moscow: Voyenizdat, 1985)] ( New York: Pergamon Brassey's 1988), 213-14. For the Soviet approach to threat assessment in historical perspective, see John Erickson, "Threat Identification and Strategic Appraisal by the Soviet Union, 1930-1941", in Ernest R. May, ed., Knowing One's Enemies: Intelligence Assessment before the Two World Wars ( Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1984), 375-423. A discussion of the Soviet view of NATO escalation doctrines is contained in Andrew C. Goldberg, New Developments in Soviet Military Strategy, Significant Issues Series 9, no. 7 ( Washington

-19-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Strategy after Deterrence
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 267

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.