The 1960s Cultural Revolution

By John C. McWilliams | Go to book overview

Primary Documents of the Cultural Revolution

NEW LEFT

Document 1
THE PORT HURON STATEMENT

In 1962 Tom Hayden wrote the manifesto of the Students for a Democratic Society (SDS). In The Port Huron Statement, Hayden introduced the concept of participatory democracy and identified its two central objectives: that the individual share in those social decisions determining the quality and direction of his or her life and that society be organized to encourage independence in men and women and provide the media for their common participation. Following is Hayden's preamble to The Port Huron Statement, or the New Left's "state of the nation" declaration.


INTRODUCTION: AGENDA FOR A GENERATION

We are people of this generation, bred in at least modest comfort, housed now in universities, looking uncomfortably to the world we inherit.

When we were kids the United States was the wealthiest and strongest country in the world; the only one with the atom bomb, the least scarred by modem war, an initiator of the United Nations that we thought would distribute Western influence throughout the world. Freedom and equality for each individual, government of, by, and for the people--these American values we found good, principles by which we could live as men. Many of us began maturing in complacency.

-127-

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The 1960s Cultural Revolution
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Other Titles in the Greenwood Press Guides To Historic Events of the Twentieth Century ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Copyright Acknowledgments v
  • Advisory Board vi
  • Contents vii
  • Series Foreword ix
  • Preface xiii
  • Acknowledgments xv
  • Chronology of Events xvii
  • Bibliography xxxvii
  • 1 - Historical Overview 1
  • Notes 23
  • 2 - The New Left and The End of Consensus 27
  • Notes 42
  • 3 - Give Peace a Chance: The Antiwar Movement 47
  • Notes 61
  • 4 - Tune In, Turn On, Drop Out: The Counterculture 65
  • Notes 79
  • 5 - Legacy of the 1960s Cultural Revolution 83
  • Notes 98
  • Biographies - The Personalities Behind the Cultural Revolution 101
  • Primary Documents of The Cultural Revolution 127
  • Glossary of Selected Terms 161
  • Annotated Bibliography 165
  • Index 175
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