The 1960s Cultural Revolution

By John C. McWilliams | Go to book overview

Glossary of Selected Terms
Acid: A counterculture term for LSD.
Acid rock: A new genre of popular music originating in San Francisco in the 1960s referring to psychedelic rock and lyrics making references to drugs. The most popular acid rock bands were the Grateful Dead, Jefferson Airplane, and Iron Butterfly.
Antiwar movement: Refers collectively to marches, demonstrations, and protests against the war in Vietnam.
Bell-bottoms: A hippie style of pants that were tight at the waist, then flared out from the knee to the ankle.
Days of Rage: Part of the Weathermen's "revolution" of the working class when six hundred radicals fought with Chicago police in October 1969.
Doves, hawks: Figurative labels for people who opposed and supported the Vietnam War, respectively.
Draft card: A card issued by the Selective Service System designating one's status for military duty; every American male citizen over age eighteen was required to carry one; the most frequently used classifications were I-A (eligible for the draft), 2-S (student deferment), and 1-Y (temporary deferment).
Earth Day: First observed on April 22, 1970, as a day to show nationwide concern for the environment.
The establishment: A counterculture term referring to people over thirty years old who exerted power and authority.
Freak: A young hippie who wore long hair and used hallucinogenic drugs.

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The 1960s Cultural Revolution
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Other Titles in the Greenwood Press Guides To Historic Events of the Twentieth Century ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Copyright Acknowledgments v
  • Advisory Board vi
  • Contents vii
  • Series Foreword ix
  • Preface xiii
  • Acknowledgments xv
  • Chronology of Events xvii
  • Bibliography xxxvii
  • 1 - Historical Overview 1
  • Notes 23
  • 2 - The New Left and The End of Consensus 27
  • Notes 42
  • 3 - Give Peace a Chance: The Antiwar Movement 47
  • Notes 61
  • 4 - Tune In, Turn On, Drop Out: The Counterculture 65
  • Notes 79
  • 5 - Legacy of the 1960s Cultural Revolution 83
  • Notes 98
  • Biographies - The Personalities Behind the Cultural Revolution 101
  • Primary Documents of The Cultural Revolution 127
  • Glossary of Selected Terms 161
  • Annotated Bibliography 165
  • Index 175
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