The 1960s Cultural Revolution

By John C. McWilliams | Go to book overview

Annotated Bibliography

GENERAL

Anderson Terry H. The Movement and the Sixties: Protest in America from Greensboro to Wounded Knee. New York: Oxford University Press, 1995. An excellent, detailed study of sixties' activism loaded with names, events, and quotations that make for a lively chronological narrative.

Archer Jules. The Incredible Sixties: The Stormy Years That Changed America. New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1986. A broadly focused history of the 1960s that emphasizes the social chaos.

Brown Joe David, ed. Sex in the '60s. New York: Time-Life Books, 1968. An anthology of articles from Time magazine that provides a contemporary chronicle of how marriage, sexual permissiveness, and morality in general changed during the 1960s.

Burner David, Making Peace with the 60s. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1996. A comprehensive history of the sixties that discusses numerous subjects, including music, drugs, student unrest, the counterculture, and politics.

Chafe William H. The Unfinished Journey: America Since World War II. New York: Oxford University Press, 1995. Although the focus is not on the 1960s, this book provides a solid background of the events and people who shaped the decade.

Conlin Joseph R. Troubles: A Jaundiced Glance Back at the Movement of the Sixties. New York: Franklin Watts, 1982. In a reflective look at the 1960s, the author views the decade as more popularly significant than it really was.

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The 1960s Cultural Revolution
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Other Titles in the Greenwood Press Guides To Historic Events of the Twentieth Century ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Copyright Acknowledgments v
  • Advisory Board vi
  • Contents vii
  • Series Foreword ix
  • Preface xiii
  • Acknowledgments xv
  • Chronology of Events xvii
  • Bibliography xxxvii
  • 1 - Historical Overview 1
  • Notes 23
  • 2 - The New Left and The End of Consensus 27
  • Notes 42
  • 3 - Give Peace a Chance: The Antiwar Movement 47
  • Notes 61
  • 4 - Tune In, Turn On, Drop Out: The Counterculture 65
  • Notes 79
  • 5 - Legacy of the 1960s Cultural Revolution 83
  • Notes 98
  • Biographies - The Personalities Behind the Cultural Revolution 101
  • Primary Documents of The Cultural Revolution 127
  • Glossary of Selected Terms 161
  • Annotated Bibliography 165
  • Index 175
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