A Search for a Postmodern Theater: Interviews with Contemporary Playwrights

By John L. DiGaetani | Go to book overview

A. R. GURNEY

A. R. Gurney has become one of America's most successful and respected playwrights. His plays have been produced in New York, and there have also been many college and regional theater productions. His The Cocktail Hour enjoyed a long run in New York at the Promenade Theater.

His plays include Love in Buffalo ( 1958), The Bridal Dinner ( 1962), The Rape of Bunny Stuntz ( 1966), The David Sbow ( 1966), The Golden Fleece ( 1968), The Problem ( 1969), The Love Course ( 1970), Scenes from American Life ( 1970), Children ( 1974), Who Killed Richard Cory? ( 1976), The Middle Ages ( 1977), The Wayside Motor Inn ( 1977), The Golden Age ( 1981), The Dining Room ( 1982), What I Did Last Summer ( 1983), The Perfect Party ( 1986), Sweet Sue ( 1986), Another Antigone ( 1988), The Cocktail Hour ( 1989), Love Letters ( 1990), and The Old Boy ( 1991).

He has also written three novels: The Gospel According to Joe, Entertaining Stranger, and The Snow Ball. In 1971 Gurney won a Drama Desk Award; he won a Rockefeller Award in 1977 and a National Endowment for the Arts Award in 1982. He won the Award of Merit from the American Academy and Institute of Arts and Letters in 1987. He serves on the council of the Dramatists Guild and is a member of the artistic board of the Playwrights Horizons. He has also taught in the English Department at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology for the last twenty-five years.

A. R. Gurney has established a reputation as a distinctive and significant playwright. Among his best-known plays are The Cocktail Hour, Sweet Sue, Cbildren, Another Antigone, and The Dining Room. His The Cocktail Hour, starring Nancy Marchand and Keene Curtis, received excellent reviews in New York and played off-Broadway for a year. His Love Letters, a reading of letters from a long friendship which ended in the suicide of one of the correspondents, was one of the great successes of the 1990 New York season; the show began off-Broadway and then moved to a Broadway house.

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A Search for a Postmodern Theater: Interviews with Contemporary Playwrights
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Copyright Acknowledgments v
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction xi
  • Robert Anderson 1
  • Alan Ayckbourn 15
  • Eric Bentley 27
  • Ed Bullins 39
  • Mart Crowley 47
  • Jules Feiffer 55
  • Horton Foote 65
  • Michael Frayn 73
  • Larry Gelbart 83
  • Amlin Gray 91
  • Simon Gray 97
  • John Guare 105
  • A. R. Gurney 113
  • ChriS+̄topher Hampton 121
  • William M. Hoffman 133
  • Israel Horovitz 139
  • Tina Howe 149
  • David Henry Hwang 161
  • Albert Innaurato 175
  • David Ives 183
  • Barrie Keeffe 191
  • Romulus Linney 199
  • Craig Lucas 211
  • Terrence Mcnally 219
  • Adrian Mitchell 229
  • Richard Nelson 237
  • Marsha Norman 245
  • Eric Overmyer 253
  • David Storey 259
  • Timberlake Wertenbaker 265
  • August Wilson 275
  • Lanford Wilson 285
  • Paul Zindel 295
  • Bibliography 305
  • Index 309
  • About the Author *
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