A Search for a Postmodern Theater: Interviews with Contemporary Playwrights

By John L. DiGaetani | Go to book overview

ADRIAN MITCHELL

Adrian Mitchel's first professional work for the stage was The Ledge, a libretto with music by Richard Bennett which was first staged in London in 1961 and began his lifelong interest in musical theater. One of the great successes of the 1964 London season was Mitchell's adaptation of Peter Weiss's The Persecution and Assassination of Jean-Paul Marat as Performed by the Inmates of the Asylum of Charenton Under the Direction of the Marquis de Sade. Mitchel's translation and adaptation of Mozart The Magic Flute was staged at Covent Garden in 1966, the year that also saw the staging of the play US. Mitchel Tyger: A Celebration of the Life and Work of William Blake appeared in London in 1971. Man Friday (with music by Mike Westbrook) appeared in 1973, the same year as Mind Your Head (with music by Andy Roberts). The Government Inspector appeared in Nottingham in 1974, followed in 1976 by A Seventh Man (with music by Dave Brown). White Suit Blues, a play about Mark Twain in heaven, was produced in London in 1977.

Mitchel next wrote the libretto for Houdini: A Circus-Opera for the Amsterdam Opera, with music by Peter Schat. Mitchel's adaptation of Thurber The White Deer as a children's play appeared in 1978, and 1979 saw the London premiere of Mitchel Hoagy, Bix, and Wolfgang Beethoven Bunkhaus, which later played at the Mark Taper Theatre in Los Angeles. The children's play Mowgli's Jungle was first staged in Manchester in 1981. Another chidren's play, The Wild Animal Song Contest, was first done in London in 1982. Mitchel also did the lyrics for Animal Farm, a musical based on George Orwell novel. Satle Day/Night appeared in 1986, followed that same year by the children's play The Pied Piper. In 1987 Mitchel's adaptation of Goldoni Mirandolina was produced in Bristol, followed by The Snow Queen in 1989.

Mitchel has also worked, whenever possible, with Welfare State International, Britain's nearest equivalent to the San Francisco Mime Troupe or the Bread and Puppet Theater.

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A Search for a Postmodern Theater: Interviews with Contemporary Playwrights
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Copyright Acknowledgments v
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction xi
  • Robert Anderson 1
  • Alan Ayckbourn 15
  • Eric Bentley 27
  • Ed Bullins 39
  • Mart Crowley 47
  • Jules Feiffer 55
  • Horton Foote 65
  • Michael Frayn 73
  • Larry Gelbart 83
  • Amlin Gray 91
  • Simon Gray 97
  • John Guare 105
  • A. R. Gurney 113
  • ChriS+̄topher Hampton 121
  • William M. Hoffman 133
  • Israel Horovitz 139
  • Tina Howe 149
  • David Henry Hwang 161
  • Albert Innaurato 175
  • David Ives 183
  • Barrie Keeffe 191
  • Romulus Linney 199
  • Craig Lucas 211
  • Terrence Mcnally 219
  • Adrian Mitchell 229
  • Richard Nelson 237
  • Marsha Norman 245
  • Eric Overmyer 253
  • David Storey 259
  • Timberlake Wertenbaker 265
  • August Wilson 275
  • Lanford Wilson 285
  • Paul Zindel 295
  • Bibliography 305
  • Index 309
  • About the Author *
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