In the Footsteps of the Masters: Desmond M. Tutu and Abel T. Muzorewa

By Dickson A. Mungazi | Go to book overview

The Role of the Church in
South Africa and the Legacy of Trevor Huddleston

The Church is facing the challenge of the extent which it must meet now and which it cannot meet effectively with official pronouncements alone.

-- Father Trevor Huddleston, 1956


CHURCH AND POLITICS IN SOUTH AFRICA

The extraordinary role that Desmond Mpilo Tutu played in the transformation of South Africa is part of a legacy left behind by Bishop E. Trevor Huddleston, an unusual and highly dedicated Anglican priest whose views and role in South Africa were similar to those of Mother Teresa of the Missionary Charities in Calcutta, India, where she dedicated her entire life to serving the poor. Huddleston arrived in South Africa in 1943 at a time when South Africa was going through a period of critical developments that were destined to alter its course for the next 50 years.

On March 26, 1943, Die Burger, an Afrikaans newspaper, suggested for the first time that the government of South Africa must develop a racial policy known as apartheid to keep the races apart.1 On January 25, 1944, Daniel F. Malan, a member of the Nationalist Party, explained that the purpose of the new policy was to ensure the safety of the white race and of Christian civilization by the honest maintenance of the principles of apartheid and guardianship.2

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In the Footsteps of the Masters: Desmond M. Tutu and Abel T. Muzorewa
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents ix
  • Illustrations xi
  • Preface xiii
  • Acknowledgments xvii
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - The Role of the Church In South Africa and the Legacy of Trevor Huddleston 19
  • Notes 37
  • 2 - The Role of the Church In Zimbabwe and the Legacy of Ralph E. Dodge 39
  • Notes 57
  • 3 - Tutu's South Africa and Muzorewa's Zimbabwe Compared 61
  • Notes 81
  • 4 - Desmond M. Tutu: The Man And His Mission 85
  • Notes 105
  • 5 - Abel T. Muzorewa: The Man and His Mission 109
  • Notes 126
  • 6 - Tutu's Role in the Political Transformation of South Africa 129
  • Notes 147
  • 7 - Muzorewa's Role in The Political Transformation of Zimbabwe 149
  • Notes 172
  • 8 - Tutu and Muzorewa in the Footsteps of the Masters: Summary, Conclusion, and Implications 175
  • Notes 203
  • Selected Bibliography 207
  • Index 219
  • About the Author *
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