History of Ancient Art

By Franz Von Reber; Joseph Thacher Clarke | Go to book overview
Fig. 263. --Janus Quadrifrons in the Forum Boarium.

ROME.

IT has been remarked in the preceding section that the term "Etruscan art" admits, in many respects, of no definite restriction. The southern boundaries of the country between the Po and the Gulf of Tarention had early been colonized by the Greeks, but its artistic industry was, in the primitive historical ages, chiefly in the hands of the Etruscans, and their name alone has on this account been applied to the architecture, sculpture, and painting of all Central Italy. But neighboring races, notably the Umbrians, Latins, and Sabines, also took part in the development of this artistic civilization--advancing, in great measure, from common starting-points, and with like results. The migrations and commerce of the nations inhabiting the Italian peninsula were not less extended and active than were those of the people occupying the Peloponnesos and the islands of the Ægean Sea: the relations to the Orient, through the

-413-

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History of Ancient Art
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents ix
  • List of Illustrations xv
  • Egypt. 1
  • Chaldæa, Babylonia, and Assyizia. 48
  • Persia. 99
  • PhŒnicia, Palestine, And, Asia Minor. 130
  • Hellas. 175
  • Etruria. 387
  • Rome. 413
  • Glossary. 473
  • Index 479
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