History of Ancient Art

By Franz Von Reber; Joseph Thacher Clarke | Go to book overview

GLOSSARY.
IT has been the translator's endeavor to avoid technical terms wherever this was possible without detracting from exactness of expression. Of those which it has proved necessary to introduce into the present History, it is intended in this glossary to define neither words in common usage, like basilica, battlement, column, etc., nor those designations of infrequent occurrence which should be interpreted whenever employed, like the Greek and Latin names of the many divisions of the ancient theatre, bath, and gymnasion. A few of the former--as, for instance, the too often interchanged channel, flute, and reed--have, however, been given for the sake of discrimination. In these cases, and in the case of some other words which are often employed in senses too widely extended to allow of their being used without qualification in careful architectural descriptions, it has been attempted to make some advance towards precision of usage.
Ab′acus (Gr. ἄßケξ -ακος. Lat. abax and abacus, a slab. Possibly in its architectural signification from ßαστάζω, to lift up, to bear). The plinth which forms the upper part of the capital--supporting the entablature by bearing the lower surface of the epistyle beam. The abacus is the crowning member of the capital, as the capital is of the column. In the Doric style it is thick and of square plan, in the Corinthian order thin and curved upon the sides.
Acrote′rion, pl. acroteria (Gr. from ἄκρος, outermost). The ornaments, such as statues or anthemion shields, placed upon the angles of the gable--whether of the outer corners or of the apex. The term is also applied to the pedestals of these ornaments.
Ag′onal, adj. (from Gr. ἀγών, festive gathering, especially an assembly met to see games; also the place of contest itself). Pertaining to a festive destination. The word agones is used for the arena itself by Grote. (For the hypothetical distinction between agonal temples and those consecrated alone to the worship of a deity, introduced by Boetticher, see p. 214.)
Ag'ora (Gr. an assemblage of the people; hence, the place where such meetings were commonly held). A public square or marketplace. Synonymous with the more familiar Latin forum.
Amphiprosty′los, adj. amphip′rostyle (from Gr. ἀμøί, on both sides; πρό, in front of; and στῦος, column). A term applied to a temple having a columned portico at the rear (epinaos), as well as at the front (pronaos), but without lateral columns.
An′nulet (Lat. annulus, or, according to the best manuscripts, anulus, ring, terminated by Ital. diminutive). A small fillet encircling the base of the Doric echinos. The number of annulets is commonly three.
An′ta, pl. antæ (Lat.). Terminations similar to pilasters upon the ends of the lateral walls of the cella, in pronaos and epinaos. Though a corresponding member, the anta is in form but little allied to the column, because its individual function is so different.
An′tefix (from Lat. ante, before, and fixus, fixed). An upright ornament like a small shield, placed above the corona when the gutter is omitted, to hide the end of the jointing tile ridge.
Anthe′mion (Gr. patterned with flowers, from ἀνθέω, to blossom). The so-called palmetto or honeysuckle ornament, employed on

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History of Ancient Art
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents ix
  • List of Illustrations xv
  • Egypt. 1
  • Chaldæa, Babylonia, and Assyizia. 48
  • Persia. 99
  • PhŒnicia, Palestine, And, Asia Minor. 130
  • Hellas. 175
  • Etruria. 387
  • Rome. 413
  • Glossary. 473
  • Index 479
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