The Last Years of the Soviet Empire: Snapshots from 1985-1991

By Vladimir Shlapentokh; Neil F. O'Donnell | Go to book overview

GORBACHEV'S GLASNOST: THE LESSON FOR AMERICAN MEDIA MAY 1987

This snapshot highlights the American mass media's infatuation with Gor-
bachev and glasnost, and the resulting unwillingness to critically examine
processes and events in the Soviet Union. As later snapshots will reveal, the
American mass media will remain enamored of Gorbachev long after the
Soviet people have grown tiredaxd of his long-winded speeches and empty
promises.

NBC's recent broadcast of the Phil Donahue shows taped in Moscow was interesting not so much because they yielded new insights into Soviet society, but because they illustrated how poorly some American journalists understand the USSR, and how helpless they are in confronting Soviet demagoguery.

In this respect, the discussions between American correspondents in Moscow and their Soviet counterparts in New York were especially interesting. Among other things, the Soviet journalists aggressively accused their American colleagues of ignoring developments in the USSR resulting from Gorbachev's glasnost, and of systematically and intentionally denigrating Soviet life.

Regarding their first accusation, the Soviet journalists were essentially correct. If American journalists, including Donahue himself, more clearly understood the essence of Gorbachev's perestroika (or overhauling), they would not allow Soviet journalists to display such hubris and be so overbearing in their debates before the American public.

Throughout the Brezhnev era, Soviet correspondents in the United States, along with all official Soviet visitors to the United States, praised Soviet society as near-perfect. Delivering their praise with apparent enthusiasm, fervor, and sincerity, these Soviet spokespersons rejected even minor criticism as fabrications of bourgeois propaganda created by the White House, the CIA, the military-industrial complex, and so on.

Gorbachev's speeches (particularly those at the January meeting of the Central Committee), along with thousands of articles in the Soviet press since 1985--articles far more critical than those of even the bravest of Soviet dissidents and the most rabid anti-Soviet idealogues in the West--have almost completely destroyed Soviet official ideology. Gorbachev's addresses have revealed the absurdity of official Soviet textbooks, as well as of the hundreds of books and thousands of articles written by Western liberals who, in trying to be "objective" regarding Soviet society (as they were

-47-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Last Years of the Soviet Empire: Snapshots from 1985-1991
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 223

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.