The Last Years of the Soviet Empire: Snapshots from 1985-1991

By Vladimir Shlapentokh; Neil F. O'Donnell | Go to book overview

YELTSIN IN A DIFFERENT PERSPECTIVE MARCH 1991

It seems that, with nearly every snapshot, Boris Yeltsin looms larger in the
frame. This particular snapshot details Yeltsin's sources of support as well
as opposition, and clarifies why Gorbachev had little choice but to let Yeltsin
continue his rise to prominence.

These days it is not Mikhail Gorbachev who drives Soviet domestic polic, but Boris Yeltsin. Yeltsin is on the offense; Gorbachev is on the defense. In his March 9 speech to a meeting of democrats, and in his March 19 interview on Soviet TV, Yeltsin launched all-out attacks on Gorbachev and his obedient parliament. In doing so, Yeltsin thrust himself into the center of a fierce political struggle, and it is now more important than ever that he and Gorbachev define their attitudes toward one another.

Gorbachev and the Soviet parliament consider Yeltsin no more than an unrepentant political adventurist prepared to sacrifice his country in the service of his insatiable ambition. Yeltsin's demands for immediate privatization and price liberalization only confirm Gorbachev's perception of him as a pure demagogue who blatantly disregards the complexities of switching from a command to a market economy, and thereby threatens to plunge the already sick country into a coma.

Moreover, Yeltsin's call to voters to reject Gorbachev's referendum on March 17 convinced Gorbachev that Yeltsin is seeking nothing less than the collapse of the Soviet Union. Gorbachev has said several times recently that Yeltsin is maliciously destroying any serious chance of creating a new union--a union in which the republics could truly be autonomous and yet still enjoy the benefits of economic, political, and cultural cooperation. According to Gorbachev, Yeltsin has intentionally ignored several crucial facts: that one quarter of the population live as minorities in various regions, that many republics have territorial claims on each other, and that, without the common "economic space" of the USSR, most of the republics, which are technologically backward and have no chance for intensive foreign trade, are doomed to economic catastrophe.

Anatolii Lukianov, the chairman of the Soviet parliament, lamented on Soviet TV on March 9 that, by encouraging the removal of the Soviet Supreme authorities through undemocratic means such as strikes and meetings, Yeltsin threatens to destroy the main fruits of perestroika: the extremely frail legal foundations of the existing political order.

Although it hardly seems possible, the army is even more hostile to Yeltsin than is Gorbachev. To the majority of the officers, most of whom are

-176-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Last Years of the Soviet Empire: Snapshots from 1985-1991
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 223

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.