Cognition, Creativity, and Behavior: Selected Essays

By Robert Epstein | Go to book overview

INTRODUCTION

Cognition, Creativity, and Behavior is a collection of papers about that formidable triumvirate. Here is where I stand on each topic:

Cognition. As a graduate student, I had the following bastardized quotation taped at eye level to the exterior of my office door:

Prayer of the Devout
Cognitive Scientist

"Oh, Mind, if I have one,
please reveal to me today
the proper set of Rules--
if there are any."

--after Voltaire

Voltaire was actually more concerned with God and Soul,1 but what the heck. I didn't think much of the study of mind, even if it had been dressed up with a nine-letter word ("cognition"). I was an adherent of the school of thinking called "behaviorism," about which I am occasionally critical in this volume. My mentor and friend, B. F. Skinner, was one of the principal authors of this school, and I disagreed with him about very little.

By 1983, about two years after I had completed my graduate training, my views began to evolve, in large part because of some historical research I was doing on the history of behaviorism (see Part IV) and, to some extent, because of the increasingly complex behavioral phenomena I was studying in the laboratory (Parts I, II, and III). My historical research convinced me that behaviorism, as such, was the unfortunate outcome of a turf battle in early psychology departments. Some early psychologists, especially those who studied animals, were interested in studying behavior for its own sake. Psychology as a distinct scientific discipline, however, had its roots in the German practice of

-xiii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Cognition, Creativity, and Behavior: Selected Essays
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 362

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.