The Psychopathology of Serial Murder: A Theory of Violence

By Stephen J. Giannangelo | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

The production of this work would have been impossible without the input of many friends. Certainly, of great help were my advisors at Sangamon State University (now University of Illinois at Springfield), whose comments and suggestions I appreciate. Thank you, Karen Kirkendall, Joel Adkins, and Ron Ettinger.

I'd like to note the technical assistance of Karen Kleinsak, Judy Rodden, and Kim Egger. These are friends whose computer-related expertise kept me from producing this work in pencil. Also of great help in the technical arena was Dale E. Lael, whose graphic and production assistance is appreciated.

I must also mention Mike Giannangelo and Keith Hanson, whose mailings always included a new, helpful reference item.

A special note of appreciation goes to Dani Waller for the arduous task of proofreading some difficult material. Bob Craner, Ken Daugherty, and Irene Kelly-Pasley also deserve thanks for their various contributions along the way.

Finally, I must thank my friend, colleague, and mentor, Steven Egger. Over the past few years, Dr. Egger's influence and guidance enabled me to develop and formulate this work, and I must acknowledge his indispensable role in my efforts.

-xi-

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The Psychopathology of Serial Murder: A Theory of Violence
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Part I - The Development of a Serial Murderer 1
  • 1 - Introduction: An Identification of the Offender 3
  • 2 - Clinical Diagnoses and Serial Killer Traits 7
  • 3 - Background and Development of the Serial Killer 21
  • Part II - Toward Development of a Theory of Violence 45
  • 4 - Theoretical Discussion 47
  • 5 - Case Studies 55
  • 6 - Case Studies Analysis 79
  • 7 - Theoretical Analysis and Development 85
  • 8 - Conclusion 93
  • Appendix A - Case Briefs 103
  • Appendix B - Explanation of Terms 107
  • References 111
  • Index 119
  • About the Author *
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