Life and Times of Stein: Or, Germany and Prussia in the Napoleonic Age - Vol. 1

By Sir J. R. Seeley | Go to book overview

CHAPTER VI.
STEIN DURING THE WAR.

FROM a letter written to Vincke on January 3rd, we learn Stein's view of the state of affairs just after the Treaty of Schönbrunn.

I trust your Excellency's disquiet about the present condition of public affairs may be somewhat alleviated by the following considerations.

Had a great force, moral and intellectual, guided our State, it would have led the Coalition, before it suffered the blow which overtook it at Austerlitz, to the great goal of the emancipation of Europe from French ascendancy, and after that blow it would have restored it. This force was wanting; I can as little blame him to whom Nature had denied it as you can reproach me with not being Newton. I acknowledge the will of Providence, and nothing is left but faith and resignation.

Hannover is to be occupied and administered. You imagine the came of our taking advantage of circumstances and uniting Hannover with our State. But it is otherwise. Buonaparte has occupied Hannover, and will assuredly not give it back to England the Peace. Austria demanded it for the Elector of Salzburg, but Buonaparte refused it to him and offered it to us. We occupy and administer till the Peace, when it will be assured to us.

Is Prussia to reject this aggrandizement, which rounds her territory and strengthens her in population and revenue?

Is she to leave in the game condition this point of attack for England, which endangers her own security? What is to happen? Is the war to go on in North Germany, and the forces of the Allies to be scattered or driven into the sea?

Assuming -- not admitting -- your discontent to be reasonable, is your discouragement and despondency justified by this? has the Prussian monarchy no interest for you but your personal relation to the sovereigns? in what relation does this State stand to Germany, to European civilization -- is its existence a matter of indifference, is it unfavorable to the elevation of humanity? What a contrast makes our perpetual grumbling at the government with the devotion of the Austrian to his monarch, who began a war in thoughtlessness and ended it in cowardice!

The letter to which this is the answer and unfortunately also the other letters of Vincke to Stein just at that critical period are lost. Of Stein's to Vincke two or three others remain VOL. 1.

-177-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Life and Times of Stein: Or, Germany and Prussia in the Napoleonic Age - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 552

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.