The Army's Nuclear Power Program: The Evolution of a Support Agency

By Lawrence H. Suid | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 5
THE NUCLEAR POWER PROGRAM IN FULL BLOOM

Although the SM-1A was the Army's first field facility to be planned and started, the delays in construction and testing prevented the Fort Greeley plant from becoming the first field reactor on the line. That honor went to the PM-2A, located in the ice tunnels of Camp Century, 138 miles inland from Thule Air Force Base on the Greenland ice cap and less than 900 miles from the North Pole. The Nuclear Power Field Office, U.S. Army Engineer Reactors Group, as the Army Reactors Group had been redesignated on July 15, 1958, began planning for the PM-2A in early October 1958.1

The requirement for the nuclear reactor grew out of the Army's desire to maintain a year-round research and development facility on the Greenland ice cap. During the 1950s, the Corps of Engineers had established several bases on the ice cap for military and scientific research. Camp Tuto, 14 miles inland from the Thule Air Force Base, served as headquarters for the Corps' Polar Research and Development Center and provided facilities for scientists conducting cold weather studies. At Camp Fistclinch, 220 miles east of Thule, the Engineers undertook an extensive investigation of Arctic construction techniques, including the use of snow as a building material. These bases operated only during the summer months, however, due to the difficulties of providing logistic support during the long arctic winters.

Two Air Force radar stations had operated year round on the Greenland ice cap until 1957 when they sank into the snow. They had demonstrated that continuous operation under severe arctic conditions was feasible, but the problems the Air Force had supplying them with fuel suggested that a nuclear power plant might provide the solution for maintaining a permanent research facility on the ice cap. As a result, when the Army began planning for the construction of a new base for research and development in Greenland, the Nuclear Power Field Office received the task of providing the power source.

-57-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Army's Nuclear Power Program: The Evolution of a Support Agency
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Recent Titles In Contributions in Military Studies ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • Chapter 1 The Beginnings 1
  • Notes 16
  • Chapter 2 Organization of the Nuclear Program 19
  • Notes 27
  • Chapter 3 Building the Prototype 29
  • Notes 38
  • Chapter 4 Fort Greely 41
  • Notes 55
  • Chapter 5 The Nuclear Power Program in Full Bloom 57
  • Notes 79
  • Chapter 6 The Nuclear Program in Decline 81
  • Notes 93
  • Chapter 7 Transition 95
  • Notes 113
  • Chapter 8 Facilities Engineering Support Agency (FESA) 117
  • Notes 126
  • Bibliographical Essay 127
  • Index 128
  • Index 129
  • About the Author 131
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 134

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.