The Army's Nuclear Power Program: The Evolution of a Support Agency

By Lawrence H. Suid | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 8
FACILITIES ENGINEERING SUPPORT AGENCY (FESA)

As the Engineer Power Group had become an agency in search of a mission by the end of 1973, the Corps of Engineers was seeking an agency to undertake a new assignment. In addition to its civil and other military engineering assignments, since the end of World War II the Corps had supplied Engineer officers as post engineers to operate utilities and maintain facilities on Army bases. For the most part, in the decades of the 1940s, 1950s, and 1960s, the officers assigned to these positions were not of the caliber of those who had or were to later receive the important assignments necessary to advance to positions of high command within or outside the Corps.1

Given this reality, the assignment as a post engineer seemed to be a "kiss of death" to a career even if the records showed the officer's performance as post engineer rated as high or higher than his other assignments. In addition to any lack of talent, the post engineer seldom had an adequate staff in quality or numbers to provide him with the professional assistance he needed. When these shortcomings were combined with the lack of resources in funds and engineering support from the Corps itself, a low level of post maintenance usually resulted. Such deficiencies in men and actions gave rise to a bad image for the Corps within the Army itself.2

In 1968, in recognition of this and related problems, the Army Chief of Staff had initiated a study to provide a comprehensive analysis of the total management of the service's real property maintenance activities. Lt. Gen. L. G. Lincoln headed the study group that examined all reports of previous investigations and did its own research and analysis. Unlike the earlier studies whose recommendations "were rarely if ever carried out," according to Lincoln, his work gave new impetus to the operation and maintenance of the Army's facilities. A subsequent study described the Lincoln recommendations as giving "new direction and impetus" to the Army's operations

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The Army's Nuclear Power Program: The Evolution of a Support Agency
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Recent Titles In Contributions in Military Studies ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • Chapter 1 The Beginnings 1
  • Notes 16
  • Chapter 2 Organization of the Nuclear Program 19
  • Notes 27
  • Chapter 3 Building the Prototype 29
  • Notes 38
  • Chapter 4 Fort Greely 41
  • Notes 55
  • Chapter 5 The Nuclear Power Program in Full Bloom 57
  • Notes 79
  • Chapter 6 The Nuclear Program in Decline 81
  • Notes 93
  • Chapter 7 Transition 95
  • Notes 113
  • Chapter 8 Facilities Engineering Support Agency (FESA) 117
  • Notes 126
  • Bibliographical Essay 127
  • Index 128
  • Index 129
  • About the Author 131
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