CHILDREN OF ADAM

TO THE GARDEN THE WORLD

To the garden the world anew ascending,
Potent mates, daughters, sons, preluding,
The love, the life of their bodies, meaning and being,
Curious here behold my resurrection after slumber,
The revolving cycles in their wide sweep having brought me
again,
Amorous, mature, all beautiful to me, all wondrous,
My limbs and the quivering fire that ever plays through them,
for reasons, most wondrous,
Existing I peer and penetrate still,
Content with the present, content with the past,
By my side or back of me Eve following,
Or in front, and I following her just the same.


FROM PENT-UP ACHING RIVERS

FROM pent-up aching rivers,
From that of myself without which I were nothing,
From what I am determin'd to make illustrious, even if I
stand sole among men,
From my own voice resonant, singing the phallus,
Singing the song of procreation,
Singing the need of superb children and therein superb grown
people,
Singing the muscular urge and the blending,
Singing the bedfellow's song (O resistless yearning!
O for any and each the body correlative attracting!
O for you, whoever you are, your correlative body! O it, more
than all else, you delighting!)
From the hungry gnaw that eats me night and day,
From native moments, from bashful pains, singing them,
Seeking something yet unfound though I have diligently sought
it many a long year,

-79-

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Leaves of Grass
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page I
  • Introduction III
  • Contents xiii
  • Leaves of Grass 1
  • Children of Adam 79
  • Calamus 97
  • Birds of Passage 195
  • Sea-Drift 213
  • Drum-Taps 239
  • Memories of President Lincoln 278
  • Index of First Lines 305
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