Oratory and Rhetoric in the Nineteenth-Century South: A Rhetoric of Defense

By W. Stuart Towns | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 4
Envisioning the Perfect Society: The Defense of Slavery and the South

Slavery of the black African was the rock which nearly shattered the American nation. For four decades, North and South debated, argued, skirmished, preached, and finally fought over this issue. During the process, southerners became increasingly paranoid and defensive about their peculiar institution, until, at the end, they believed their only recourse was secession, and ultimately, if need be, civil war. When the war was over, however, and slavery was overcome, few in the South regretted its demise. There was no attempt to reinstitute it (although some of the state Black Codes came close in the years immediately after the war). It was almost as if the South collectively breathed a sigh of relief and was generally pleased to see the institution destroyed. But from 1820 to 1865, southern leadership did everything possible politically, rhetorically, and militarily to preserve and defend human bondage.

Significantly, it was recognized and acknowledged by many that slavery made a difference within the new American nation. James Madison, the "Father of the Constitution," was a Virginia planter and slave owner who remarked that it was "pretty well understood that the real difference of interests lay, not between the large & small but between North & South'n States. The institution of slavery & its consequences formed the line of discrimination."1

Even though sentiment for abolition did not gain wide support until the nineteenth century, there were always some Americans who opposed slavery. In New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, and New England slavery was declared illegal in the 1770-1790 period, due primarily to the Quakers in that area who applied pressure to the institution. Not only was there Quaker influence in this Northern area, there were also few slaves with which to deal. In 1790 less than six percent of American slaves lived in the North, by 1820 less than one percent, and during the 1820s it had dwindled to less than

-53-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Oratory and Rhetoric in the Nineteenth-Century South: A Rhetoric of Defense
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 212

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.