Oratory and Rhetoric in the Nineteenth-Century South: A Rhetoric of Defense

By W. Stuart Towns | Go to book overview
8.
Eleanor Flexner, "Ida Bell Wells-Barnett," in Notable American Women, 1607-1950, vol. III, Edward T. James, ed. ( Cambridge, MA: Belknap Press, 1971), 565.
9.
Donald L. Grant, Anti-Lynching Movement, 1883-1932 ( San Francisco, CA: R and E Research Associates, 1975), 29.
10.
Address delivered at Lyric Hall in New York City, October 5, 1892. Printed as a pamphlet in November of that year; this version is from Outspoken Women: Speeches by American Women Reformers, 1635-1935, Judith Anderson, ed. ( Dubuque, IA: Kendall/Hunt Publishing Co., 1984), 206-220.

FOR FURTHER READING

Degler Carl N. The Other South: Southern Dissenters in the Nineteenth Century. New York: Harper and Row, 1974.

Williamson Joel. A Rage for Order: Black-White Relations in the American South since Emancipation. New York: Oxford University Press, 1986.


Atticus Greene Haygood

Mann Harold W. Atticus Greene Haygood: Methodist Bishop, Editor, and Educator. Athens: University of Georgia Press, 1965.

Towns Stuart. "Atticus G. Haygood: Neglected Advocate of Reconciliation and a New South," Southern Studies 26 (Spring 1987), 28-40.


Ida Wells-Barnett

Broschart Kay Richards. "Ida B. Wells-Barnett." In Women in Sociology: A BioBibliographical Sourcebook, Mary Jo Deegan, ed. New York: Greenwood Press, 1991. 432-439.

Brundage W. Fitzhugh. Lynching in the New South: Georgia and Virginia, 1880-1930. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1993.

Wells Ida B. Crusade for Justice: The Autobiography of Ida Wells, Alfreda M. Duster, ed. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1970.

-----. The Memphis Diary of Ida B. Wells. Miriam Decosta-Willis, ed. Boston: Beacon Press, 1996.

-204-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Oratory and Rhetoric in the Nineteenth-Century South: A Rhetoric of Defense
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 212

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.