The New Eurasia: A Guide to the Republics of the Former Soviet Union

By David T. Twining | Go to book overview

2
The Russian Federation
The Russian Republic, always a significant element in the Soviet era but lacking autonomy from the center that directed it, has taken on a new life. President Boris Yeltsin, who proclaimed before the U.S. Congress on June 17, 1992, that the "idol of Communism" had "collapsed, never to rise again,"1 has not only brought new life to what is now known as the Russian Federation, or simply Russia, but also has acted resolutely to resolve ethnic disputes that threaten the very fabric of the new Eurasia. Although other impressive national leaders are entering the political scene in the new states, none has the power and authority to achieve real change that the president of the Russian Federation has.
BASIC DATA
Total Area: 6,592,813 square miles (17,075,200 square kilometers). Russia is the largest country in the world.Population: 150 million, with an annual growth rate of 0.4 percent. More than one hundred nationalities live in the country. The population is 82 percent Russian, 4 percent Tatar, 3 percent Ukrainian.Religion: Russian Orthodox, Muslim, Roman Catholic, Protestant, Jewish.Official Name: Russian Federation.Capital: Moscow.Government:
Executive Branch: President Boris Yeltsin, elected on June 12, 1991, is head of state; he assumed the post of prime minister in November 1991

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The New Eurasia: A Guide to the Republics of the Former Soviet Union
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents ix
  • Maps xi
  • Preface xiii
  • Acknowledgments xv
  • Introduction xvii
  • Key Terms xix
  • Notes xx
  • 1 - The Former Soviet Union 1
  • Notes 30
  • 2 - The Russian Federation 35
  • Notes 55
  • 3 - The Baltic States 63
  • Notes 79
  • 4 - Western Region 83
  • Notes 109
  • 5 - The Caucasus 115
  • Notes 136
  • 6 - Central Asia 139
  • Notes 173
  • 7 - The Debris of the Former Soviet Union 179
  • Notes 190
  • 8 - Selected Biographies 195
  • Notes 199
  • For Further Reading 201
  • Index 205
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