Shamanism: The Neural Ecology of Consciousness and Healing

By Michael Winkelman | Go to book overview

presents it in its rightful light as a set of sophisticated traditions for managing self, emotions, and consciousness. Shamanic practices elicit neurognostic structures to facilitate the symbolic action on self, psyche, and psychobiology. Knowledge of human nature -- mind and body -- incorporated into shamanic beliefs and practices provides resources for modern psychodynamic adjustment and development. The different ASC traditions share effects on self and on emotions, but they differ in specific psychodynamics, reflecting different social conditions and their effects on psychological structures, self, and others.


NOTES
1.
"Metaphor is a way of thinking of it in relation to a vehicle ( Ortony 1979). Metaphor works by mapping the topic onto the high salience features of the vehicle, finding additional salient features and then translating back to the topic domain" ( Kirmayer 1993, 172). The interaction of topic and vehicle is necessary for metaphoric relation. "Topic and vehicle are conceptual models or structures that function as operators to asymmetrically modify each other. Metaphors relate structures, not their elements" (173).
2.
"Meaning is at once sensuous, emotional and conceptual [and situated] . . . in relation to body and society, archetype and myth . . . Metaphoric concepts conjoin the abstract and the concrete in experience so thought and feeling are aspects of the same image, concept, or action. Our complex thoughts and feelings are built on a foundation of simpler metaphors that involve motivational judgments that are closer to what we mean by the term emotion" ( Kirmayer 1993, 184).
3.
The reptilian brain (R-complex) is based in a group of ganglionic structures at the base of the forebrain, including the striatal complex consisting of a group of structures (olfactostriatum, corpus striatum, globus pallidus, and others) that belong to the basal ganglia (which has been implicated in the causation of obsessive compulsive disorder).

-276-

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Shamanism: The Neural Ecology of Consciousness and Healing
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • List of Illustrations ix
  • Preface xi
  • Acknowledgments xvii
  • 1 - Shamanism and Consciousness: an Introduction 1
  • Notes 53
  • 2 - The Nature and Basis of Shamanism: Cross-Cultural and Neurophenomenological Perspectives 57
  • Notes 111
  • 3 - Physiological and Phenomenological Bases of Altered States of Consciousness 113
  • Notes 187
  • 4 - Physiological Bases of Shamanistic Therapies 191
  • Notes 230
  • 5 - Psychophysiological Dynamics of Shamanistic Healing 231
  • Notes 276
  • Bibliography 277
  • Index 307
  • About the Author *
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