The Unseen Wall Street of 1969-1975: And Its Significance for Today

By Alec Benn | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

More than sixty people helped me write this book. Each helped make it what it is. I am especially grateful to the men and women who spent time and thought talking to me about their experiences and what they personally observed. Most were interviewed in their offices, a few in their homes, a few at mine, and a few over the telephone. Usually one interview was enough, but Jim Lynch was interviewed several times. He also reviewed the several previous drafts of the manuscript.

Of those who helped in other ways, two stand out. The editorial guidance of Eric Valentine, publisher of Quorum Books, was invaluable in shaping this book. We often argued heatedly about important matters as well as a few that made little difference, such as the correct use of a preposition. But he was usually right, and I am grateful for his intense scrutiny of what I wrote while at the same time providing valuable guidance in the overall organization of the book. What is more, the winner always made an intense effort to soothe the loser's ego.

The other editor was my wife, Caroline M. Benn. She read and criticized the many drafts of this book. Her advice was invaluable not only because of her editorial judgment but also because she lived through this period on Wall Street (and later) as a general assistant at Benn & MacDonough, Inc., a vice president of Hornblower & Weeks-Hemphill Noyes, a vice president of Loeb Rhoades, Hornblower, and as communications director of The Bond Market Association, retiring at the end of 1998 as a senior vice president.

-xv-

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