National Health Care: Law, Policy, Strategy

By Donald L. Westerfield | Go to book overview

2
The Uninsured and Underinsured

With approximately 34.4 million persons under the age of 65 uninsured and millions more underinsured, "16 percent of the population under 65 are uninsured. For minority populations, the statistics are worse--for example, 21.7 percent of blacks are uninsured, and 34.9 percent of Mexican Americans are uninsured."1 It is remarkable that there has been no real progress in access to health care in the most current decade.2 It is not common knowledge that millions of workers are not covered by any kind of health care plan. It is also not common knowledge that even workers with health care plans often cannot afford to get health care, due to the high "up front" deductible.3

A person who is making between $20,000 and $30,000 with a nonworking spouse and any children will have a hard time just trying to scrape up even $50 to $75 for some office visits, plus at least that much for the prescribed medicine. Additionally, many of those with marginal incomes find that they have to face staggering costs associated with complications such as underweight and/or critically ill babies, indigent dependents, and family members with chronic illnesses or conditions, just to name a few. Such costs, even for families with moderate incomes can be devastating to the family financial structure.4

A good example of the plight even people with insurance face is tragically illustrated in the case of Ann Krame of Saint Louis and her son, Stephen, who had a 14-hour operation to rebuild his pulmonary artery system. "Stephen's six-month hospital stay cost more than

-13-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
National Health Care: Law, Policy, Strategy
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Figures and Tables xi
  • Preface xiii
  • Part I - National Health Care Issues 1
  • 1 - Introduction 3
  • Notes 11
  • 2 - The Uninsured and Underinsured 13
  • 3 - Underwriting, Impaired Risks," and Pooling" 29
  • 4 - Play or Pay" and Subsidies" 43
  • Part II - Health Care Proposals in Congress 53
  • 5 - Major Universal" Plans in Congress" 55
  • 6 - Pay-or-Play" Proposals in Congress" 67
  • 7 - Health Care Reform Proposals in Congress 79
  • Part III - Special Interests, the Law and Political Posturing 91
  • 8 - Special Interests and Legislation 93
  • Notes 100
  • 9 - The Law--Federal Mandates 103
  • 10 - Obstacles Faced By Small Businesses 115
  • Part IV - National Policy and Strategies 127
  • 11 - Other National Models 129
  • Notes 140
  • 12 - Rationing Policies and Strategies 143
  • Part V - A National Health Care Plan 151
  • 13 - Workers Compensation 153
  • 14 - Proposed National Health Care Plan 161
  • 15 - Between Now and 2000 A.D. 171
  • Bibliography 177
  • Index 197
  • About the Author *
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 204

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.