To Acknowledge a War: The Korean War in American Memory

By Paul M. Edwards | Go to book overview

Chapter 7
Operations

Designed to meet abnormal military inhibitions, our strategic plan involved constant movement to keep the enemy off balance.

Gen. Matthew Ridgway

Americans have a long tradition of commemoration. They have acknowledged the massive and essential battles in which Americans have tested their principles and their personal honor. Through a long and often violent history, many such national tests come to mind: Lexington, Concord Bridge, Yorktown, the Battle of Lake Erie, Antietam, Gettysburg, Guantanamo, Meuse-Argonne, the Battle of Leyte Gulf, the Battle of the Bulge, Hamburger Hill.

Many highly significant battles were fought in the Korean War. Perhaps the battle most remembered is Chosin, a major defeat. Acknowledging the Korean War properly will require considerable study of many of the other engagements, like Chipyong-ni, Gloucester Hill, Kunu-ri, and the Naktong Perimeter. There also needs to be further analysis of the prolonged hill war that so typified the fighting in Korea.

In addition to specific battles, the military is often called upon to focus its resources and personnel on particular targets or project. These efforts were often given names reflective of the missions involved. Some operations had immediate combat goals, others were long-term efforts or even national politics. The following twenty-one operations reflect of some of the significant, and highly interesting, special missions of the Korean War.


OPERATION ALBANY

By November 1950, Eighth Army had captured, and was holding, several thousands of prisoners of war. This was many more prisoners than had been anticipated. The United Nations Command was pushed to the limit to provide troops for the advance toward the Yalu River; there were few troops available to guard the prisoners securely. Nor were there people available to provide care

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To Acknowledge a War: The Korean War in American Memory
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Recent Titles in Contributions in Military Studies ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Chapter 1 - Introduction 1
  • Chapter 2 - The Long Silence 15
  • Chapter 3 - Naming the War 27
  • Chapter 4 - Who Is to Blame 41
  • Chapter 5 - Some of the Controversies 53
  • Chapter 6 - Leaders and Scoundrels 75
  • Chapter 7 - Operations 89
  • Chapter 8 - The United Nations Force 103
  • Chapter 9 - Revising the Revisionists 121
  • Chapter 10 - The Fighting Just Stopped 135
  • Chapter 11 - The Wrong War 147
  • Bibliography 155
  • Subject Index 163
  • Military Unit Index 173
  • About the Author 177
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