Debating the Issues in Colonial Newspapers: Primary Documents on Events of the Period

By David A. Copeland | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 18
The Sons of Liberty, 1765-1776

In the summer of 1765, Boston Gazette printer Benjamin Edes and eight merchant friends, who called themselves the Loyal Nine, met in Boston. They regarded the Stamp Act (see Chapter 16), which was to go into effect in America on November 1, 1765, as a direct threat to their livelihoods as well as those of many others. The printer knew his weekly newspaper afforded the group the perfect mouthpiece to criticize the British tax which would require all paper used in the colones to be affixed with a stamp purchased from a British agent or stamp man. Edes and fellow printer John Gill filled the Boston Gazette with attacks against the tax and England.

The Loyal Nine were not finished, however. They organized a series of protests in Boston, including the hanging in effigy of Boston's stamp man, Andrew Oliver. Before August ended, riots broke out in Boston as citizens rallied against the new British tax. Oliver subsequently resigned, and no one in Boston wanted to assume the job.

About the same time Edes and his associates were organizing in Boston, a similar group was doing the same in New York City. In fact, comparable bands sprang up throughout America. While they sometimes used various names for themselves, these groups quickly became known collectively to all as the Sons of Liberty, and they led America's united effort against the Stamp Act.

The Sons of Liberty soon opened their secret meetings to any who wanted to attend. They met in public places, such as the liberty poles or

-216-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Debating the Issues in Colonial Newspapers: Primary Documents on Events of the Period
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 397

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.