Space, Time, and Freedom: The Quest for Nationality and the Irrepressible Conflict, 1815-1861

By Major L. Wilson | Go to book overview

Notes

Chapter 1
1
By his approach to the subject from the "Union" side, Paul C. Nagel has provided many useful insights into the growth of nationalist thought. In the beginning the Founding Fathers regarded the Union as an "experiment," as one possible means for achieving the goals of the common life. But as technological development tended through time to forge irreversible bonds of physical unity, the commanding presence of Union took on the character of an end or "absolute." One Nation Indivisible: The Union in American Thought, 1776-1861 ( New York: Oxford University Press, 1964). By the approach taken in the present study from the "Liberty" side, the effort has been made to focus upon the meaning which the debate over freedom gave to the Union and not upon the limits which an "absolute" Union placed on freedom.
2
By analyzing American liberalism in the context of the European experience, Louis Hartz found that a fundamental consensus obtained. This did not rule out, however, the possibility of a meaningful debate among liberals in the nineteenth century, nor does it relieve the historian from the task of tracing out the elements of conflict. The damaging admission that his "liberal society analysis" cannot account for the conflict over slavery points up the limits of the consensus view, for it is thus unable to explain the most "liberal" event in the nation's history since the Revolution. The Liberal Tradition in America: An Interpretation of American Political Thought Since the Revolution ( New York: Harcourt, Brace, 1955), 19.
3
Richard D. Birdsall, "The Second Great Awakening and the New England Social Order," Church History, XXXIX ( September, 1970), 345-64; Clifford S. Griffin, Their Brothers' Keepers: MoralStewardship in the United States, 1800-1865

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Space, Time, and Freedom: The Quest for Nationality and the Irrepressible Conflict, 1815-1861
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • 1- Liberty And Union 3
  • 2- The Missouri Controversy 22
  • 3- Time and The American System 49
  • 4- Nullification and The Emergence Of Jacksonian Democracy 73
  • 5- Manifest Destiny 94
  • 6- Free Soil and The Irrepressible Conflict 120
  • 7- The Crisis And Compromise of 1850 148
  • 8- Progress and The Irrepressible Conflict 178
  • 9- Seward and The Repressible Conflict 211
  • Notes 239
  • Index 301
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