Brazilian Culture: An Introduction to the Study of Culture in Brazil

By Fernando de Azevedo; William Rex Crawford | Go to book overview

CHAPTER TWO
THE ORIGINS OF SCHOLASTIC INSTITUTIONS

The revival of culture in Brazil -- The influence of the ideas of the encyclopedists -- Azeredo Coutinho and the Seminary of Olinda -- The work of Dom João VI: the founder of institutions -- The first schools for higher vocational training -- The foundation of law courses in the first Empire -- The Additional Act ( 1834) and decentralization -- The absence of organized basic teaching and of general university teaching -- The Colégio Pedro II -- The patriarchal economy and the corresponding type of culture -- Education for civilization based on slavery -- Exaggerated tendency in the direction of the liberal careers -- The predominance of a culture of professional character -- Popular education and the first normal schools -- Secondary education of a classical type -- The almost exclusive cultivation of belles lettres -- The splendor and decay of private secondary education -- The great educators -- The cooperation of the religious orders in secondary education -- The activity of Dom Pedro II -- The influence of the higher institutions of culture -- The reforms of the Viscount of Rio Branco -- The School of Mines in Ouro Preto -- The opinion of Rui Barbosa in 1882 -- Tendencies of pedagogical thought -- The last speech from the throne-A fruit which was not yet ripe . . .

BETWEEN THE EXPULSION of the Jesuits in 1759 and the removal of the Portuguese court to Brazil in 1808, there is a parenthesis of almost half a century, a long hiatus which is characterized by the lack of organization and decay of colonial education. No institutional organization, in fact, came to take the place of the powerful homogeneity of the Jesuit system, which had grown up all along the plantation owning coast, with branches in the wooded interior and on the plateau, and whose colleges and seminaries in the colony were the great centers for the spread of culture. In their places, we have seen, what arose under the pressure of circumstances were isolated classes in fragmentary and scattered subjects which hardly succeeded in taking on the appearance of systematic education in the rare, religious schools established in convents. But neither the mass departure of the Fathers of the Society of Jesus nor the reforms of Pombal with their belated effect upon the colony, succeeded in shaking the social and cultural unity which had been imparted by the religious idea and maintained by the same conception of life and culture and by the same social and economic regime. The type of teaching and education adopted by the Jesuits, -- a system which was moreover useful for the ends of their principal consumer, the Church, and had formerly been organized by the Church --, appeared to satisfy entirely the elementary requirements of the society at that time with its agricultural and slave owning structure in which study, when it was not a mere luxury for the feudal and aristocratic group, was no more than a means of social classification for mestizos and the business bourgeoisie of the cities. Remaining almost entirely ecclesiastical, all of this traditional teaching which had been transferred from the hands of the Jesuits to those of the secular priests and to the Franciscan and Carmelite friars, -- their natural continuers, as they were the most lettered part of colonial society --, did not catch in their meshes any more than the students who

-365-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Brazilian Culture: An Introduction to the Study of Culture in Brazil
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 562

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.