Brazilian Culture: An Introduction to the Study of Culture in Brazil

By Fernando de Azevedo; William Rex Crawford | Go to book overview

SUBJECT INDEX
ABOLITION, 410, 412, 428, 432 consequences of, 106 growth of primary education and, 493, 494 romanticism and the abolitionist ideal, 209 slaveholding mentality and technical education, 383
ACADEMY
Brazilian Academy of Letters, 215
Brazilian Academy of Sciences, 233 of Fine Arts, 298, 301n., 416
Imperial Naval, 499n.
Medico-Chirurgical, 236
Military, 236
Military of the Court, 499n.
Military and Naval, 499n.
National and Imperial Naval, 499n.
National, of medicine, 185n., 233
Naval, 175n.
Royal Military, 174, 174n.
Royal Naval, 175n.
Royal, of Painting, Sculpture, and Architecture, 373 of Sciences of Paris, 253, 253n.
Scientific, 233
AFRICANS

African population in Brazil, 31-33

Catholicism and, 147-148 popular Brazilian music and, 285-286 slavery. See ABOLITION, NEGRO SLAVERY

See ASSIMILATION

AGRICULTURE agricultural properties. See PROPERTY agricultural schools. See under SCHOOLS coffee. See COFFEE coivara, destruction of forests by fire, 54 monoculture. See MONOCULTURE
National Center of Agricultural Education and Research, 506n. polyculture, 58-62, 430
Royal Garden, 238, 239 sugar cane. See SUGAR sugar mills. See SUGAR MILLS tiling of the soil and the Jesuits, 350-351
See also BOTANY, ECONOMY, SCHOOL, STATISTICS
AGRONOMY. See AGRICULTURE
AMERICAN INDIANS. See ASSIMILATION, NATIVES
American Naval Mission, 502
ANTHROPOLOGY, 257, 258
ARCHITECTURE campaign for traditional architecture, 310 churches and convents of Bahia, 151 cloisters of the Northeast, 278, 279 colonial houses, 283, 284 colonial renaissance, as a function of its architectural elements, 310, 311 landscape architecture and, 311, 312 modern, 311 religious and civil, 276, 284 urban developments in the twentieth century, 309, 310, 311

See also ACADEMY, ART, LICEU, MUSEUM, SCHOOL, SOCIETY

ARISTOCRACY aristocratic education, 381 landed, a conservative force in the Republic, 106, 107 rural, in colonial society, 94, 95; and the monarchical regime, 101, 102
ART aesthetic education of the peole, 318, 319 appearance of, in Brazil, 276, 277 applied, 299; applied to industry, 317, 318 architecture, See ARCHITECTURE artistic expansion, 304, 305 artistic maturity of the country, 319
Baroque style. See BAROQUE caricature. See CARICATURE carving, 306n., 307n. centers of artistic life, 298, 305, 306 ceramics, 305n., 317, 318 criticism of, 318-320 development of, under Dutch rule, 274-276 drawing. See DRAWING factor in cultural documentation, 273-274 French influence and colonial art, 289-298 gardens and architecture, 311, 312 goldsmithing, 282-283, 307n. modern movement in, 319 music. See MUSIC Painting. See PAINTING political decentralization and, 304, 305 popular and native arts, 304, 305 public and the artist, 315-318
Republic and the development of art in Brazil, 273-274 sculpture. See SCULPTURE
Servico do Patrimonio Historico e Artistico Nacional, 484n. zenith of, and of economic life, 279
See also ART INSTITUTIONS
Art Institutions: See ACADEMY, ART, ASSOCIATION, CENTER, CONSERVATORY, INSTITUTE, LICEU, MUSEUM, SCHOOL, SOCIETY

-543-

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