CHAPTER II
TRAVELING WITH TERROR

WE MADE camp there beside the peaceful river. There Perry told me all that had befallen him since I had departed for the outer crust.

It seemed that Hooja had made it appear that I had intentionally left Dian behind, and that I did not purpose ever returning to Pellucidar. He told them that I was of another world and that I had tired of this and of its inhabitants.

To Dian he had explained that I had a mate in the world to which I was returning; that I had never intended taking Dian the Beautiful back with me; and that she had seen the last of me.

Shortly afterward Dian had disappeared from the camp, nor had Perry seen or heard aught of her since.

He had no conception of the time that had elapsed since I had departed, but guessed that many years had dragged their slow way into the past.

Hooja, too, had disappeared very soon after Dian had left. The Sarians, under Ghak the Hairy One, and the Amozites under Dacor the Strong One, Dian's brother, had fallen out over my supposed defection, for Ghak would not believe that I had thus treacherously deceived and deserted them.

The result had been that these two powerful tribes had fallen upon one another with the new weapons that Perry and I had taught them to make and to use. Other tribes of the new federation took sides with the original disputants or set up petty revolutions of their own.

The result was the total demolition of the work we had so well started.

Taking advantage of the tribal war, the Mahars had gathered their Sagoths in force and fallen upon one tribe after another in rapid succession, wreaking awful havoc among them and reducing them for the most part to as

-22-

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Pellucidar
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • By the Author of "Tarzan" 1
  • Title Page 3
  • Prolog 5
  • Chapter I - Lost on Pellucidar 12
  • Chapter II - Traveling with Terror 22
  • Chapter IV - Friendship and Treachery 32
  • Chapter V - Surprises 53
  • Chapter VI - A Pendent World 63
  • Chapter VIII - Captive 73
  • Chapter IX - Hooja's Cutthroats Appear 92
  • Chapter XI - Escape 101
  • Chapter XII - Kidnaped! 110
  • Chapter XIII - Racing for Life 130
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