CHAPTER IX
HOOJA'S CUTTHROATS APPEAR

I HAD BUILT a little shelter of rocks and brush where I might crawl in and sleep out of the perpetual light and heat of the noonday sun. When I was tired or hungry I retired to my humble cot.

My masters never interposed the slightest objection. As a matter of fact, they were very good to me, nor did I see aught while I was among them to indicate that they are ever else than a simple, kindly folk when left to themselves. Their awe-inspiring size, terrific strength, mighty fighting- fangs, and hideous appearance are but the attributes necessary to the successful waging of their constant battle for survival, and well do they employ them when the need arises. The only flesh they eat is that of herbivorous animals and birds. When they hunt the mighty thag, the prehistoric bos of the outer crust, a single male, with his fiber rope, will catch and kill the greatest of the bulls.

Well, as I was about to say, I had this little shelter at the edge of my melon-patch. Here I was resting from my labors on a certain occasion when I heard a great hub-bub in the village, which lay about a quarter of a mile away.

Presently a male came racing toward the field, shouting excitedly. As he approached I came from my shelter to learn what all the commotion might be about, for the monotony of my existence in the melon-patch must have fostered that trait of curiosity from which it had always been my secret boast I am peculiarly free.

The other workers also ran forward to meet the messenger, who quickly unburdened himself of his information, and as quickly turned and scampered back toward the village. When running these beast-men often go upon all fours. Thus they leap over obstacles that would slow up a human being, and upon the level attain a speed that would make a thorough-

-92-

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Pellucidar
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • By the Author of "Tarzan" 1
  • Title Page 3
  • Prolog 5
  • Chapter I - Lost on Pellucidar 12
  • Chapter II - Traveling with Terror 22
  • Chapter IV - Friendship and Treachery 32
  • Chapter V - Surprises 53
  • Chapter VI - A Pendent World 63
  • Chapter VIII - Captive 73
  • Chapter IX - Hooja's Cutthroats Appear 92
  • Chapter XI - Escape 101
  • Chapter XII - Kidnaped! 110
  • Chapter XIII - Racing for Life 130
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