Rousseau on International Relations

By Stanley Hoffmann; David P. Fidler et al. | Go to book overview

3
Fragments on War (c.1755-1756)
1. In order to understand precisely what are the laws of war let us examine closely the nature of the case, and admit only that which necessarily follows. Two men are fighting in the state of nature; there clearly is a condition of war between them. But why are they fighting? Are they set upon eating one another? Even among animals that occurs only between different species. It is the same with men as it is between wolves in that the issue involved in the quarrel is always quite divorced from the lives of the combatants. It of course happens that one of them may be killed in the fight, but his death is the means to victory and not its purpose, because as soon as one admits defeat, the victor grabs hold of the thing in dispute, the fighting stops, and the war is over.

One should note that social life surrounds us with a multitude of things which derive more from our imaginings than our needs and to which we are naturally indifferent. So much so that for the most part the issues in war become even more alien than in the state of nature and eventually reach the point where individuals care very little about what goes on during a public war. One takes up arms in order to settle questions of strength, wealth, or prestige and the subject of such matters finishes by being so removed from the lives of citizens that they are neither better nor worse off by being victors or

-48-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Rousseau on International Relations
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Permissions vi
  • Acknowledgements And Memorial Tribute vii
  • Contents ix
  • Introduction xi
  • Note lxxix
  • I- Discourse on Political Economy (1755) 1
  • 2- The State of War (c. 1755-1756) 33
  • 3- Fragments on War (c.1755-1756) 48
  • 4- Abstract and Judgement of Saint- Pierre's Project for Perpetual Peace (1756) 53
  • 5- First Version of the Social Contract (1761) 101
  • 6- Constitutional Project For Corsica (1765) 139
  • Foreword 139
  • 7- Considerations on the Government Of Poland (1772) 162
  • Research Bibliography 197
  • Index 203
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 218

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.