The Wrong Set: And Other Stories

By Angus Wilson | Go to book overview

CRAZY CROWD

Jennie leaned forward and touched him on the knee. "What are you thinking about, darling?" she asked. "I was thinking about Tuesday," Peter said. "It was nice, wasn't it?" said Jennie, and for a moment the memory of being in bed with him filled her so completely that she lay back with her eyes closed and her lips slightly apart. This greatly excited Peter and he felt the presence of the old gentleman in the opposite corner of the carriage as an intolerable intrusion. A moment later she was staring at him, her large dark eyes with their long lashes dwelling on him with that sincere, courageous look that made him worship her so completely. "All the same, Peter, I wish you didn't have to say Tuesday in that special voice.""What should I have said?" he asked nervously. "I should have thought you could have said, 'I was thinking how nice it was when we were in bed together,' or something like that." Peter laughed. "I see what you mean," he said. "I wonder if you do.""I think so. You prefer to call a spade a spade.""No, I don't," said Jennie. "Spades have nothing to do with it." She lit a cigarette with an abrupt, angry gesture. "There's nothing shocking about it. No unpleasant facts to be faced. It's just that I don't like covering over something rather good and pleasant with all that stickiness, that hesitating and making it sacred with a special kind of hushed voice. I think that kind of thing clogs up the works.""Yes," said Peter. "Perhaps it does. But isn't it just a convention? Does it mean any more?""I think so,"

-124-

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The Wrong Set: And Other Stories
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents *
  • Fresh Air Fiend 3
  • Totentanz 20
  • Union Reunion 44
  • Saturnalia 68
  • Realpolitik 80
  • A Story Of Historical Interest 90
  • The Wrong Set 113
  • Crazy Crowd 124
  • A Visit In Bad Taste 148
  • Raspberry Jam 157
  • Significant Experience 178
  • Mother's Sense Of Fun 201
  • Et Dona Ferentes 219
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