Christian Society and the Crusades, 1198-1229

By Edward Peters | Go to book overview

II. Crusade and Council, 1208-1215

1. The Albigensian Crusade: From the Chronicle of Roger of Wendover

Rogerof Wendover began to write his chronicle at St. Albans monastery in Englandaround 1217and continued to 1235, when he was succeeded by Matthew Paris. Rogerwas uniquely well informed and a sensible user of documentary evidence. His account of the Council and the events of the Albigensian Crusade reflect the point of view of a learned, uninvolved English cleric who had the power of organizing events and presenting a coherent narrative. The selections from Roger's chronicle in this volume are taken from J. A. Giles ' translation in Bohn's Antiquarian Library, London, 1849, Volume II. The best discussion of Roger's work is that by V. H. Galbraith, Roger Wendover and Matthew Paris ( Glasgow, 1944).


The Albigensian Heresy and the Launching of the Crusade, 1208.

About that time the depravity of the heretics called Albigenses, who dwelt in Gascony, Arumnia, and Alby, gained such power in the parts about Toulouse, and in the kingdom of Arragon, that they not only practised their impieties in secret as was done elsewhere, but preached their erroneous doctrine openly, and induced the simple and weak-minded to conform to them. The Albigenses are so called from the city of Alba, where that doctrine is said to have taken its rise. At length their perversity set the anger of God so completely at defiance, that they published the books of their doctrines

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Christian Society and the Crusades, 1198-1229
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Editor's Note vii
  • Introduction ix
  • I - The Fourth Crusade, 1202-1207 1
  • II - Crusade and Council, 1208-1215 25
  • III - The Fifth Crusade, 1217-1222 48
  • IV - The Emperor's Crusade, 1227-1229 146
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