Domesticity with a Difference: The Nonfiction of Catharine Beecher, Sarah J. Hale, Fanny Fern, and Margaret Fuller

By Nicole Tonkovich | Go to book overview

Chapter Two
FATHERLESS DAUGHTERS

Sarah Josepha Hale and Fanny Fern

In her "Literary Notices" column of Godey's Lady's Book and Magazine for February 1855, Sarah Josepha Hale noted the publication of Fanny Fern Ruth Hall. A Domestic Tale of the Present Times. By that time Ruth had been extensively promoted by its publishers, who had claimed that the book was in its third edition only four days after its initial appearance ( Geary388). Hale, who had herself profited from such publicity only three years earlier, was a reviewer whose notices of books she liked were glowing and lengthy. She gave Ruth Hall only two sentences: "As a writer, the author of this volume has been very successful and very popular. Her success and popularity may be increased by this 'domestic tale;' but, as we never interfere in family affairs, we must leave readers to judge for themselves" (50: 176).

Hale's dismissal of Fern's novel is certainly not surprising, since Godey's public reputation dictated that it promote only novels suitable for ladies' and family reading. Ruth was a racy novel. The book was already notorious as an autobiographical exposé of strained family relations between two of the popular press's star columnists. In the novel, it was reported, Fanny Fern, a popular writer for the True Flag, the Olive Branch, and the Musical World and Times, had effectively accused her brother N.P. Willis, one of New York's leading editors, of refusing to aid her financially after her husband's death. Hence Hale's punningly dismissive phrase "we never interfere in family affairs" refers both to the book's subtitle and to the public controversy then raging around the book.

Hale's review seems to suggest a great difference between these two women. As the oldest woman and the youngest woman treated here, they represent two generations of writing women. Hale, one of the first women

-26-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Domesticity with a Difference: The Nonfiction of Catharine Beecher, Sarah J. Hale, Fanny Fern, and Margaret Fuller
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 230

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.