Israeli Peace/Palestinian Justice: Liberation Theology and the Peace Process

By Thomas L. Are | Go to book overview

Chapter One
HUMAN RIGHTS ABUSE AS OFFICIAL POLICY

That anyone could deliberately abuse another human being is appalling. That Jews, just two generations past the Holocaust, could commit atrocities against other human beings seems impossible. Yet newspapers, magazines, Amnesty International, Save the Children, the International Red Cross, even the U. S. State Department, all speak of human rights violations. Doctors and ministers who have recently visited the occupied territories give testimony to horrible brutality. Israel's "iron fist" policy in dealing with the Intifada strikes fear in the hearts of civilized people around the world.

"Don," I asked a friend of mine who had just returned from the West bank, "Have you seen it, I mean with your own eyes? I've read about it, but it's still hard to believe."

"I have seen it," he said.

This is what he told me:

We were driving past an elementary school during recess time. The yard was full of children. Three Israeli soldiers, hardly more than youngsters themselves, were walking across the street from the school. Suddenly a rock came sailing out of the crowd. It barely made it to the street. One of the soldiers saw it. All three charged the school yard. Kids ran screaming toward the building but the soldiers caught one child, probably the smallest and slowest in the class. He looked to be about a second grader.

The little guy pleaded for them to let him go. I thought they would, but they dragged him kicking and begging to the street. They forced his hand onto a rock and as he shrieked in agony, two men held him down while the third man ground a stone back and forth over his hand until his knuckle bones were crushed.

The soldiers walked away, leaving their eight-year old victim with four broken fingers, satisfied that they had protected Israel's national security from a second grade threat.

-11-

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