Jews in the South

By Leonard Dinnerstein; Mary Dale Palsson | Go to book overview

Rabbis and Negro Rights in the South, 1954-1967

Allen Krause

F OR MANY YEARS the American vocabulary has included the phrase Solid South, but the phrase is more romantic than realistic, especially if from solid one infers uniform. Where Negro rights are concerned, there are within the southern region -- within, that is, Alabama, Arkansas, the Carolinas, northern Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, Tennessee, northeastern Texas, and Virginia -- many degrees of what James Silver calls "the closed society." Atlanta and New Orleans are worlds apart from, say, Cleveland, Mississippi, or Macon, Georgia. A continual awareness of this diversity in the makeup of Dixie is important, for, when we discuss, as we propose to do here, what the Reform rabbis 1 of the South have or have not done in the realm of civil rights since 1954, it is necessary for us to pose the question: Which South? Once this is understood, a generalization about the mood of the South as a whole might prove helpful as a point of departure.

Our generalization is simply this: The reaction of the South toward the so-called civil rights movement has been one of, at the least,

____________________
1
This investigation is limited to the Reform rabbi, first because adequate data on the southern Conservative and Orthodox rabbinate have not been available to the writer, despite his efforts to get in touch with such rabbis, in sufficient quantity to merit inclusion; then, because the writer's information about non-Reform rabbis has come, in the great majority of cases, from their Reform colleagues, and this might, rightly or wrongly, be open to charges of excessive subjectivity; and, finally, because there are simply not many non-Reform rabbis in the South. In the entire state of Mississippi, for example, there is only one Orthodox minyan served by a rabbi: see Charles Mantinband, Mississippi, the Magnolia State ( Cincinnati: American Jewish Archives, Nearprint File, 1961).

-360-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Jews in the South
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 392

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.