Six Scandinavian Novelists: Lie, Jacobsen, Heidenstam, Selma Lagerlof, Hamsun, Sigrid Undset

By Alrik Gustafson | Go to book overview

IMPRESSIONISTIC REALISM JONAS LIE

OF the literary generation in Norway that produced Ibsen and Bjørnson only one author, besides these two masters, was able to attract international attention. Jonas Lie, the first really important Scandinavian novelist, has this distinction. It must be admitted immediately, of course, that Lie's Continental vogue was by no means as extensive as was that of Ibsen; and it probably even fell considerably short of that of Bjørnson. Lie was sufficiently well known in Paris, in the 1890's, however, to attract the attention of a correspondent of the Figaro, though the interview which was arranged in consequence, instead of being reported in the Figaro, ultimately became assimiliated into a series of essays on modern Scandinavian literary figures under the general title Les révoltés scandinaves and published in 1894 in the Revue des deux Mondes. In England, at about the same time, Edmund Gosse found occasion to speak words of rather high praise on Lie in an introduction to an English translation of the Norwegian novelist's The Commodore's Daughters. But even this English critic, whose pronouncements are not always without a certain uncritical enthusiasm, especially in matters Scandinavian, is cautious in predicting for Lie any such international reputation as that of either Ibsen or Bjørnson. Gosse recollects in his Introduction a meeting with the publisher Hegel in Copenhagen, on which occasion the elegant Danish publisher presented him with the first copy of a new novel.

"You shall take this with you, if you will," said Mr. Hegel, "and make acquaintance with Jonas Lie.""And who is Jonas Lie?" I asked. "He is a Norwegian," he answered, "like our friends Bjørnson and Ibsen, and, though comparatively few people know his name to-day, I predict that in ten years' time he will have more readers than any other Scandinavian writer." The prophecy has come true, at all events so far as Scandinavia is concerned. At this moment Jonas Lie is locally the most popular of the Scandinavian novelists.

-25-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Six Scandinavian Novelists: Lie, Jacobsen, Heidenstam, Selma Lagerlof, Hamsun, Sigrid Undset
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Contents ix
  • By Way of Introduction 3
  • Impressionistic Realism Jonas Lie 25
  • Toward Decadence Jens Peter Jacobsen 73
  • Nationalism Reinterpreted Verner Von Heidenstam 123
  • Saga and Legend of a Province Selma Lagerlöf 177
  • Man and the Soil Knut Hamsun 226
  • Christian Ethics in a Pagan World 286
  • Index 363
  • Index 365
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 374

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.